employer sponsorship - Page 2

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employer sponsorship - Page 2


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  #11 (permalink)  
Old 06-19-2010, 01:56 AM
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Originally Posted by rainbowchaser View Post
I am looking for employer sponsorship as well from Canada. I seem to be stuck in an ongoing loop. I have read extensively the posts on this site as well as immigration and correct if I'm wrong - but employer sponsorship is the way of the future? !

I have applied to several jobs via Seek, CareerJet, CareerOne all fantastic sources. Here's the catch I have had several employer replies saying that I cannot be considered because I don't hold a valid visa. Immigration says that priority is given to those with employer sponsorship... Am I missing something?

I have gone as far as applying directly to companies and they would "love" to consider me but... Any advice / suggestions welcome!
Immi have made the employer sponsored approach the way of their future with focus on demand driven immigration but with the greater part of the Australian employers scene never likely having had too much to do with immigration, therein lies the practicality test that bureaucrats often overlook.
Their mindset will be if an employer is desperate enough for skilled employees, they'll learn about employer sponsorship or utilise local upskilling.
On one hand, it could be said that the policy will be a retarder of economic growth because of lack of skills for busineses to develop with and yet it could also be said that employers ought to be forward planning a bit more on recruitment/staff development and that is not such a bad thing.

There are already quite a few areas where employer sponsorship is used, the medical occupations and also steel fabrication of construction industry being a couple and then there have been frequent posts by people on WHVs here who have got a job and their employer may be interested in keeping them, so that can work.
Are you young enough [ up to 30 ] and single [ or without children at least ] to look at giving a WHV a fly, doing regional work to be eligible for a second WHV would give you extra time for seeking an employer sponsor.

Local government is also an area that I have heard of using employer sponsorship more now and WA in particular has had potential employees sucked up into the resources sector by lure of good salaries.
Council Websites — WALGA might be worth a look as would scouring LG sites Australia wide if your occupation fits with that area.

But one way or another it'll be a bit of a growing curve for organisations/companies getting to the stage of not just saying we'd love to but we'll love it for you to get here and we'll be expediting the sponsorship process.





  #12 (permalink)  
Old 06-19-2010, 03:17 AM
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Originally Posted by riverletter View Post
I have just received an offshore interview from one of Australia company, and I am excited with this opportunity. Anyone who have such experience on interview, please kindly advise me some tips on this:
- How to succeed in the offshore interview?
- which is the suitable salary package for the 10 year experience engineer (electrical and electronics)
- If the company would like to arrange the interview, does it mean that they will give me the sponsorship?

Highly appreciate your prompt advice!

Thanks so much!
Riverletter
Doing an offshore interview ought to be considered much as you would consider an interview anywhere and based on the employment you have applied for and your qualifications and experience you have put forward, you should have the appropriate originals of documentation available if it is an in person interview.

If not and it is to be a phone/video link interview, that'll be all the more reason to be precise and slower than what you may normally speak and you should think of that too if it is a face to face interview.

The reason I say that is though you may use english wherever you are, accents are always significantly different, along with regional vowell pronounciations too and Australians will even struggle at times to understand what someone from New Zealand, the US, Scotland, Wales or Ireland may have said and vice versa too, especially because Australians do tend to speak fast and not always finish words fully [ we call it strine ].

Just by your writing, I suspect you are from what we refer to as the sub continent, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh or Sri Lanka and though that region and Australia both had our english origins with the British, we're a long way from that time and whereas the sub continent english has probably not so much varied in time, in Australia there has been the influence of many different languages, so there can be expression difficulties.

Do not be reticent about requesting something to be repeated if need be [ and add in if you like that your hearing is not accustomed to Australian accent - a good interviewer will thus pick up that there are variations of english ] rather than guess at what was said for whereas a company in Australia will want to assess that a person from overseas will be able to communicate well, not being prepared to get the proper understanding in the first place is a big detraction.

Part of good communication is not just listening but having good listening skills and being able to show that you have understood what was said, particularly if what was said was lengthy and so one technique is to summarise in your own mind what was asked for and then in responding, put a small phrase at the start, ie. " So you are seeking to know how I would..... " [ but do not use that style as your opening for every answer and once is probably enough ] and then you give a clear practical example but keep it concise and as short as possible.
[ Another way of answering to show that you have understood is to use keywords in your answer, eg. if asked about priority setting for customers - you answer with something like " we always have customers who have urgent work and we do advise that getting their request handled with priority will mean a surcharge " and then you can explain how your planning works.]

But re the taking a little time you will have achieved a number of things that way.
1. You have allowed yourself to more clearly think about your answer
[ And never be in too much of a rush to attempt answering a more complex question - pause a bit, and it does not hurt to say something like I am just considering what may be the best example I have of an appropriate response - but do not keep them waiting for more than 5-10 seconds, especially if it is a phone/video link ]
2. You have shown the interviewer, you are not to be panicked into a response and would want to be clear in your understanding to respond appropriately.
3. Keeping your response concise and short as will save you from drifting into a ramble which will likely then also accentuate any accent/pronounciation issues - [ it also gives the interviewer an opportunity to add to their question which in turn may give you a better understanding of what it is they seek from you and thus more opportunity for thinking of best responses.]
4. Taking your time, deliberately pausing will also help to keep that excitement in check [ under control ].

But essentially an interview is about
. Seeing that someone is who they claim to be.
. Assessing that they will have competency in their occupation and will be an asset to the organisation, hence there'll be an emphasis on your occupational experience.
. Allowing the interviewee to assess the company and ask of pertinent information.

To prepare for the interview, you ought to itemise what the selection criteria are and then make yourself up a list of how your experience matches that criteria [ as you may have done with your application ] and then think of what you would ask as exploratory questions if you were the interviewer and what you might expect as a suitable answer - [ using that logic training that engineering is all about ].
Ten years is a long time in engineering and preparing will help you review a lot of what you have learnt during that time and there may be some examples more pertinent than others.

You'll likely find that a company will explain the employment conditions at the end of the assessment questions and they'll possibly talk of a salary package including leave and superannuation entitlements etc., so do not jump in immediately with what is the salary? for that will not make a good impression.
Salaries will vary with industry and location, a mining company for instance may pay $100,000+, perhaps up to $200,000 for senior engineering management whereas for a capital city industry based position a salary could be in the $80,000 - $100,000 range but have a look at employment sites and you'll see indications.

Also do some research on the company, most having substantial information on their web sites and even a google of the company name or their activity area could reveal wider relevant information - allow you to ask industry pertinent questions, what is the companys policy on expanding services, looking to new products and/pr ovrseas markets etc., even perhaps offshore manufacture or contracts.

The interview itself does not necessarily mean that a sponsorship will occur for it is part of their selection process and they may have a number of people to be interviewed.

But just prepare well for that is really all you can do to keep the nerves and excitement under control and do not be overly impatient or pushy and whereas obviously you would like to know the next step, you could get an indication by asking a related question nearly like a statement, eg.
" I expect you are doing a number of interviews and do you have a timeframe in which you will be doing that and making a decision? "

Good luck with it and let us know how the interview goes whether or not you are successful.





  #13 (permalink)  
Old 06-21-2010, 04:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wanderer View Post
Immi have made the employer sponsored approach the way of their future with focus on demand driven immigration but with the greater part of the Australian employers scene never likely having had too much to do with immigration, therein lies the practicality test that bureaucrats often overlook.
Their mindset will be if an employer is desperate enough for skilled employees, they'll learn about employer sponsorship or utilise local upskilling.
On one hand, it could be said that the policy will be a retarder of economic growth because of lack of skills for busineses to develop with and yet it could also be said that employers ought to be forward planning a bit more on recruitment/staff development and that is not such a bad thing.

There are already quite a few areas where employer sponsorship is used, the medical occupations and also steel fabrication of construction industry being a couple and then there have been frequent posts by people on WHVs here who have got a job and their employer may be interested in keeping them, so that can work.
Are you young enough [ up to 30 ] and single [ or without children at least ] to look at giving a WHV a fly, doing regional work to be eligible for a second WHV would give you extra time for seeking an employer sponsor.

Local government is also an area that I have heard of using employer sponsorship more now and WA in particular has had potential employees sucked up into the resources sector by lure of good salaries.
Council Websites — WALGA might be worth a look as would scouring LG sites Australia wide if your occupation fits with that area.

But one way or another it'll be a bit of a growing curve for organisations/companies getting to the stage of not just saying we'd love to but we'll love it for you to get here and we'll be expediting the sponsorship process.

Hi thanks for the response. I sadly don't meet the age requirement for a working holiday visa - just a touch older than that. I will be in Australia this Aug for a short period of time. I am hoping to hit the ground running and hand out resumes and possibly meet face to face with potential employers. I noticed in another posting you mentioned that it could depend on what country your migrating from to determine some eligibility. I am a Candian, currently living in Canada.

Also would it be advisable at this point to wait to apply for the 175/176 or should i continue to seek the 457?


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  #14 (permalink)  
Old 06-21-2010, 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by rainbowchaser View Post
Hi thanks for the response. I sadly don't meet the age requirement for a working holiday visa - just a touch older than that. I will be in Australia this Aug for a short period of time. I am hoping to hit the ground running and hand out resumes and possibly meet face to face with potential employers. I noticed in another posting you mentioned that it could depend on what country your migrating from to determine some eligibility. I am a Candian, currently living in Canada.

Also would it be advisable at this point to wait to apply for the 175/176 or should i continue to seek the 457?
The mention of country would possibly have been in reference to whether someone was going to be eligible for a WHV or not.
You can consider both a 175/176 if you'll be eligible under the points approach[ and when they are open again for applications ] , looking to see if your occupation will be on a State Migration Plan for higher priority and you could also still seek a 457/ENS visa and if you have a skilled independent application made and then find an employer who is eligible and prepared to sponsor for permanent residency, the latter will be fee free on the basis of having paid the skilled independent application fee.





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