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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Just a question around permanant contributory visas. I have noticed that there are 2 visas that might apply for my mum who is considered as Aged parent based on age conditions.

Knowing that these 2 visas 143 and 864 are both faster track visas, which one is cheaper/faster and basically which one is suggested and whats their difference except the age condition?

thanks
 

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They cost the same. The aged parent visa must be applied for in Australia and can be granted in Australia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the answer.
Then in that case is there any benefit applying for 864 over 143? I.e processing time etc?

And if not then which I should apply for my aged parent ?

Thanks
 

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Thanks for the answer.
Then in that case is there any benefit applying for 864 over 143? I.e processing time etc?

And if not then which I should apply for my aged parent ?

Thanks
The big advantage is that the sc. 864 is applied for in Australia and your parent may be able to stay in Australia on a bridging visa during processing.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The big advantage is that the sc. 864 is applied for in Australia and your parent may be able to stay in Australia on a bridging visa during processing.
so basically there is no difference in terms of processing time (should be around 3 years i think?)

and also the bridging visa would it allow getting in/out of australia while waiting?

Thanks
 

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so basically there is no difference in terms of processing time (should be around 3 years i think?)

and also the bridging visa would it allow getting in/out of australia while waiting?

Thanks
I can't say anything sensible about processing times. Sc.864 used to be way faster, but who knows what the situation will be when you apply.

https://www.border.gov.au/about/acc...ards/global-visa-citizenship-processing-times

The bridging visa A does not allow travel, but the holder of a bridging visa A can apply for a bridging visa B, which does allow travel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I can't say anything sensible about processing times. Sc.864 used to be way faster, but who knows what the situation will be when you apply.

https://www.border.gov.au/about/acc...ards/global-visa-citizenship-processing-times

The bridging visa A does not allow travel, but the holder of a bridging visa A can apply for a bridging visa B, which does allow travel.
I see the website says "Unavailable due to low volume of applications."

regarding this, would it be a recommendation to apply for 143 which at least has an estimated processing time?
 

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I see the website says "Unavailable due to low volume of applications."

regarding this, would it be a recommendation to apply for 143 which at least has an estimated processing time?
It really depends on the personal circumstances of your parent, if an onshore or an offshore application is better. Personally I'd always go for an onshore application, if the option is there, but there is no point in doing it if they don't intend to stay in Australia during processing.

Obviously they'd have to able to enter Australia first on a visa without "no further stay" condition.

I don't want to speculate about processing times, but from memory the onshore application seemed to have a higher priority. I do not know if that is still the case. I don't think processing times should be the deciding factor anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It really depends on the personal circumstances of your parent, if an onshore or an offshore application is better. Personally I'd always go for an onshore application, if the option is there, but there is no point in doing it if they don't intend to stay in Australia during processing.

Obviously they'd have to able to enter Australia first on a visa without "no further stay" condition.

I don't want to speculate about processing times, but from memory the onshore application seemed to have a higher priority. I do not know if that is still the case. I don't think processing times should be the deciding factor anyway.
Hi, just one last question, as was pointed out, there is not much difference between these 2 visas in terms of anything in fact, but does it mean a parent considered as aged parent migrating with 864 can be automatically granted aged parent centrelink benefit?

I have read it on the department of social services that "To qualify for the Age Pension you must be an Australian resident, be an Australian resident for a total of at least 10 years, with at least five of these years in one period;"

was thinking if by any chance, 864 subclass possibly means whoever has the age condition of 864 as aged parent would automatically be eligible for social benefits?

thanks
 
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