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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

I am currently extremely angry as my father's visa application has now been rejected. This rejection basically cause my family split apart!

I am the single kid of my parents. I came to Australia since 2001, studying, working etc. I help my parents applying parent visa, and they were put in the queue since 2010.

It's a long wait. My mother didn't make it, died in 2016. My father made it, however, just before he receive the health check notification, he is diagnosed as late stage lung cancer. His condition is currently under control with help of new drugs.

However, due to the lung cancer, his application is rejected. I understand, he would cause "significant cost to Australian community" in the formal term, I don't argue that. I don't want Australia suffer significant cost, he got full medical cover in China anyway. But what is sooooooo inhuman is, I AM HIS ONLY RELATIVE ON THIS PLANET!

I would have sold my house in Melbourne and pack up and leave but my two kids are born in Australia with citizenship, not Chinese one. They aren't going to be easy if they live in China. And the worst thing is, I just buried my mother's ash in a Melbourne grave. Am I supposed to dig her out too?

I am very very angry at immi department's inhumanity right now!!

I need some professional advice, as for how I can bring my only father to join me in Australia?? I am pretty sure he won't have more than 5 happy years. I dont really fancy permanent residency, I just want to know if there is a visa can give him 5 years max so that while he still can walk, he can walk with me.

While I am typing this post, my father is living alone in China at his late stage cancer, clean the house himself, cook himself......

The rejection letter must be done by a robot. What kind of decent human beings can do that???
 

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If you had taken professional advice and applied onshore, and the failure to satisfy the health criterion was the only reason for refusal, your parent could have applied for a visa (subclass 602) to remain in Australia. It might still be possible to sucessfully apply for this visa, but only at considerable cost and for a limited stay.
 

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Immigration don't process applications based on emotion, they process applications based on legislation and policy. It doesn't mean they aren't human, just that the government cannot afford to let emotion dictate who is granted or not granted a visa.

Immigrants should always migrate on the assumption that they are moving away from family that remains behind, and that it may not be possible for family to join them at a later date.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Immigrants should always migrate on the assumption that they are moving away from family that remains behind, and that it may not be possible for family to join them at a later date.
This is really.........enlightening. Actually I am going to take a screen shot and save it in my computer forever.

Had I known this 17 years ago, I would have not stayed.

Good on you Maggie, I sincerely hope what you just said is just based on your "emotion" and has nothing to do with the spirit of Australia.

In the future if I see any young immigrants I will say to them, "have you said your last farewell to your old parents in your country yet? NO....? Say it, because you might not be able to see them again this is how the immigration works."
 

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Immigrants should always migrate on the assumption that they are moving away from family that remains behind, and that it may not be possible for family to join them at a later date.
I've known quite a few who have returned home permanently due to this.

However, most just visit family on holidays back home.
 

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This is really.........enlightening. Actually I am going to take a screen shot and save it in my computer forever.

Had I known this 17 years ago, I would have not stayed.

Good on you Maggie, I sincerely hope what you just said is just based on your "emotion" and has nothing to do with the spirit of Australia.

In the future if I see any young immigrants I will say to them, "have you said your last farewell to your old parents in your country yet? NO....? Say it, because you might not be able to see them again this is how the immigration works."
Unfortunately that is the way of the world, my wife's mother died the year after my wife arrived in Australia, my wife's father died 13 years later.
Family dislocations are the norm when people migrate, at least now people have the opportunity to fly back and see their family in less than 24 hours, unlike earlier generations who said goodbye forever.
 

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In the future if I see any young immigrants I will say to them, "have you said your last farewell to your old parents in your country yet? NO....? Say it, because you might not be able to see them again this is how the immigration works."
I understand your frustration, but this can indeed be the price you pay for migrating. As a previous poster pointed out, at least nowadays it is relatively cheap and fast to jump on a plane and visit family. It is not that long ago that migrants wouldn't see their families for decades or quite often never again. I don't think people appreciate how much migrants have to give up for life in the " lucky country".
 

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This is really.........enlightening. Actually I am going to take a screen shot and save it in my computer forever.

Had I known this 17 years ago, I would have not stayed.

Good on you Maggie, I sincerely hope what you just said is just based on your "emotion" and has nothing to do with the spirit of Australia.

In the future if I see any young immigrants I will say to them, "have you said your last farewell to your old parents in your country yet? NO....? Say it, because you might not be able to see them again this is how the immigration works."
My post was based on fact. You're in the same situation as a lot of other immigrants who settle here and then are frustrated when they cannot get their remaining family here. All have reasons for wanting their family together and many have reasons for wanting their family to come here vs. returning to their home country to re-join those they had left behind. So my post is related to the reality that sometimes it's not possible to have family join you in Australia so people should know this upfront and accept that possibility.

I'd suggest you speak with a migration agent to see what other options your father may have for a visa.
 
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