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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, I have been with my boyfriend for 3 years in August and we are wanting to bring him to Australia to live and work not on a student visa and not with a marriage visa.
We were hoping for some kind of working visa which can lead to a permanent residence visa or a defacto visa looks perfect for us. Except that I'm 18 (he's 23) and we haven't lived together officially. He has stayed at my house when we sponsored him to come for a 3 month holiday last year and I stay at his house when I go to Bali but nothing with both our names.
What do you think the likelihood of getting a defacto visa is and also how would we get him a working visa? Only interested in something that leads to permanent visas.
Please help, I can't find any information relating personally to my case and its making me go crazy.
Thank you
 

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What you're describing is dating rather than a defacto relationship. It's pretty impossible to get a defacto visa without living together at all.

Is there any reason he can't come to Australia on a Working Holiday Visa? He's young enough for that. You could live together for a year on that visa and collect all the evidence you need for a defacto visa. Working holiday visas are easy to get.

There are many types of work (skilled) visas, but they're only available to folks with certain types of qualifications, experience, etc. You'd have to check DIAC's visa wizard to see if he'd qualify for any of those. Some lead straight to PR, others don't (457 in particular does not, so don't bother looking at those).
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Does he have to be sponsored for that? And do you know how much it costs? That would make it easier. If he works here for a year does he have to have a set job before he comes and if someone says they will employ him for the year, can he change jobs during his stay?
 

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Unfortunately, I stand corrected - I checked, and Bali apparently is not part of the Working Holiday Visa program. :( So it doesn't look like he'd qualify for that. Your best bet now is to go through the visa wizard I linked you to. Some of the skilled visas required being sponsored by a company and some don't. The wizard will walk you through which you'd qualify for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Oh okay, I will have a look at the visa wizard but I think I've looked at that before and it hasn't been helpful. Do you think it makes a difference that I'm only 18?
Also, would it be easier of we got married do you think? We want to one day get married anyway so do you think that will be better or just as hard?
Does the fact that he's in Indonesia make it harder to get a visa in any way? Like are there countries which Australia are more 'friendly' with and more 'unfriendly' with?
 

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If you plan to get married anyway, a prospective marriage visa would be by far your best option. It requires less evidence than the defacto or the spouse visa. The primary criteria is that you must have met in person, you must establish that your relationship is genuine, etc. but you do NOT need to have ever lived together. But once your visa is granted, you must marry within nine months. There's a thread i wrote called "Which Partner Visa Should I Apply For?" at the top of the forum in the stickied threads. Take a look at it and you can read all about it.

Being from Indonesia won't keep him from getting a visa, but as a high-risk country it COULD delay your security check a little, making it take longer.
 

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Being 18 won't hurt you in the partner visa category. In the skilled category, younger is generally better, actually, though your partner may struggle to have enough experience in his profession at a younger age. I don't know enough about skilled visas to advise you beyond that I'm afraid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
With the prospective marriage visa how does that work exactly?
When he comes here after we get married and after the 9 months is over, does he have to go back to Bali and apply for a marriage visa and then wait for that anyway?
And after we get a marriage visa is it a 2 year wait to get a temporary visa and then another 2 year wait for a permanent residence visa?
Sorry for so many questions!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
With the prospective marriage visa how does that work exactly?
When he comes here after we get married and after the 9 months is over, does he have to go back to Bali and apply for a marriage visa and then wait for that anyway?
And after we get a marriage visa is it a 2 year wait to get a temporary visa and then another 2 year wait for a permanent residence visa?
Sorry for so many questions!
 

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If you read that thread I told you about it, I think most of your questions are answered there. :) But anyway... this is the process:

1) He applies for the PMV.
2) It's granted.
3) He MUST enter Australia before you marry.
4) You marry within nine months of the date of your grant, anywhere you want.
5) Once you marry, you apply for the 820 (onshore partner visa). You pay much less for this, the processing time is generally MUCH faster, and there's not as much evidence required as there is for people who apply straight to the 820. You'll provide evidence you've married, combined finances, etc.
6) While you wait for this to process, if it takes so long the PMV runs out, he'll be on a bridging visa. He is allowed to work full time on this. He is also eligible for medicare the moment he applies for the 820.
7) The 820 is granted.
8) He is eligible to apply for permanent residency two years from the date of your APPLICATION for the 820. This also is not very evidence-heavy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you so much for your help!
You have helped me more than you know!
I can't find this kind I detailed and helpful information anywhere and when I asked an agent they wanted to charge me $200 for a consultant!
God bless you and I hope only great things come to you.
Thank you so much I'm so grateful!
 

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My partner and I have been waiting 16 months for a PMV visa we applied in Bali. We have been together 3 years he can't over on a tourist visa for 3 months and we worked and lived together for 5 months. I don't know why it's taking so long but the PMV visa would be best for you to apply for just make sure you keep all evidence of your relationship. Good luck x
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you!
How did you work there?
And what kind of evidence? Like photos of us together or something?
I don't really have evidence that I stayed with him in Bali, but we have evidence that my dad sponsored him when he came to Australia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If you read that thread I told you about it, I think most of your questions are answered there. :) But anyway... this is the process:

1) He applies for the PMV.
2) It's granted.
3) He MUST enter Australia before you marry.
4) You marry within nine months of the date of your grant, anywhere you want.
5) Once you marry, you apply for the 820 (onshore partner visa). You pay much less for this, the processing time is generally MUCH faster, and there's not as much evidence required as there is for people who apply straight to the 820. You'll provide evidence you've married, combined finances, etc.
6) While you wait for this to process, if it takes so long the PMV runs out, he'll be on a bridging visa. He is allowed to work full time on this. He is also eligible for medicare the moment he applies for the 820.
7) The 820 is granted.
8) He is eligible to apply for permanent residency two years from the date of your APPLICATION for the 820. This also is not very evidence-heavy.
Sorry, I was thinking about this again and I was wondering, if the visa is granted, could we possibly not bring him over until 6 months after it's granted and then get married and there will only be 3 months of him being unable to work until he can get the bridging visa and work?
Does that make sense? Like I would rather him be able to support us as well as me, instead of only having one income.
Also, where are you getting all your information from?
 

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He can work on the PMV! :) The reason I specified he can work on a bridging visa is that that used to not be possible. DIAC changed that just last year. So he can work the entire time, as soon as his visa is granted. During the PMV, the Bridging Visa, on the 820... all of it.

As to where I get my information from - DIAC's website (read the Partner Migration Booklet - it covers a lot), migration agents, and months and months of reading information on this board and others.
 

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Oh, and if you're still thinking of waiting to bring him over -

It will just depend on how long DIAC gives him for his initial entry date. Whatever date they assign is the date by which he has to fly into Australia. Generally this is one year after either the medicals or the police check, whichever comes first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Oh that's great news! I had it in my mind that he had to wait for 9 months until he can work! That's excellent! Thank you so much!
And what are the requirements for me? Do I have to have a certain annual salary? Or a certain amount of money in my account? Or does he?
If he can work here then is being him to Australia as soon as we get the visa! :)
 

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It used to be that sponsors had to sign an Assurance of Support and sometimes provide a financial bond. That's no longer true. There's no minimum salary, and neither of you needs a particular amount in the bank. You'll want to detail how you plan to support yourselves, though, especially if you don't make a lot of money. My migration agent had my fiance (the Australian) provide his payslips and tax assessments as well, but that's not a requirement - still, it probably wouldn't hurt, and your fiance providing his that he has now (to demonstrate his earning capacity) wouldn't hurt either. Again, that doesn't seem to be a requirement, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Okay, because I earn around $200 a week and that's hardly enough to support both us but I don't get taxed
I'm currently looking for a new job mainly because I want the visa to be recognised more. And also to pay for the visa which I have just learned is quite expensive. I saw on the immigration website it will be at least $2680. Do you know how much it will be all together with the partner visa and permanent residents visa and bridgeing visa?
 

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. Do you know how much it will be all together with the partner visa and permanent residents visa and bridgeing visa?
$2680 is for the subclass 300 visa lodged in Indonesia
$995 for the 820/801 lodged in Australia after you're married

There's no fee for the bridging visa unless your partner needs to travel overseas and needs a special type of visa that allows him to re-enter Australia.
 
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