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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Under the new migration rules, most temporary visas will be subject to a condition that will enable the Immigration Department to cancel a person’s visa if they are found to be involved in online vilification based on gender, sexuality, religion, and ethnicity.

According to the Migration Legislation Amendment Regulations 2017 that came into effect on 18th November, an existing condition, 8303 has been amended to expand its scope.

The condition that earlier applied to only a few visas is now applicable to most temporary visas applied for on or after 18 November 2017.

The Immigration Minister now has the power to cancel a visa if there is evidence of a visa holder engaging in harassment, stalking, intimidation, bullying or threatening a person even if it doesn’t amount to a criminal sanction. These activities may include public ‘hate speech’ or online vilification targeted at both groups and individuals based on gender, sexuality, religion, and ethnicity.
 

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Doesn't sound like an alltogether bad thing to be honest.

Until someone else gets into your Facebook account...
Yes, I was wondering how they would know about users like myself who keep their privacy settings pretty strict. Would they be able to log into our accounts or something?

Oh well, guess this could only work in the favour of those of us who are pretty active with our partner's online!
 

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It doesn't sound like a bad thing to me. In honesty it should extend to partner visas, permanent visas etc too but to my knowledge they don't have condition 8303 so it won't.
 

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Yes, I was wondering how they would know about users like myself who keep their privacy settings pretty strict. Would they be able to log into our accounts or something?

Oh well, guess this could only work in the favour of those of us who are pretty active with our partner's online!
When you comment on a post on a public page, that's publicly visible, regardless of your own privacy settings. As an innocuous example, if you go and post on the Woolie's page that your Vegemite wasn't in your order you received, that's publicly visible. A lot of people don't have enough of an understanding of Facebook to know what's publicly visible and what isn't, and that could catch a lot of people out. I think this is good, honestly - though I think there's a lot of potential for misinterpretation/abuse of the policy, AND I think a lot of Aussie pols would fall afoul of it themselves. :eek:
 
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Best to stay off FB public posts altogether IMO, the amount of information and personal data being mined, not just on social media, but on all forms of internet or electronic transactions is mind-boggling (no pun intended). Tracking cookies and vestiges of permalinks (like on this forum) are often never deleted. I sense this community here is pretty safe, but there are thousands of people worldwide reading through this forum every hour (just look at the number of views on posts), and some forum users share very personal details. It's not hard to connect the dots to put together a semi-complete picture of someones profile by a determined agency. Not sure if DIBP peruses this forum, but if they have the time to go through facebook, then why not here as well.

Just to digress for a moment, but worth noting that in many countries, one's personal moves can or are being recorded. Here in New York, a Metrocard (similar to Oyster, Opal or Miki cards) records exactly where you entered a subway (several years back a murder case was determined by this here). An EZ-Pass (electronic highway toll-paying device) records where your vehicle crossed a bridge/tunnel or entered a highway. Other forms of surveillance such as license plate readers, installed on many police vehicles in North America at least, surveillance cameras and facial recognition - now used extensively in many public places in large metropolitan cities, and apparently now 'gait' recognition being tested in China, to the obvious credit card purchase trail. Most law abiding citizens don't need to worry about this, but the Big Brother condition we live in is very elaborate and extensive.

Interpol and police / intelligence agencies can and do share this information above and beyond standard police checks. Case in point is the recent arrests of the two young Canadian woman in Sydney who were busted for smuggling drugs on a cruise ship. The Canadian, US and Australian intelligence agencies were tracking them long before they landed in Australia. Apparently their instagram accounts were one of the tell-tale factors.
 

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Best to stay off FB public posts altogether IMO, the amount of information and personal data being mined, not just on social media, but on all forms of internet or electronic transactions is mind-boggling (no pun intended). Tracking cookies and vestiges of permalinks (like on this forum) are often never deleted. I sense this community here is pretty safe, but there are thousands of people worldwide reading through this forum every hour (just look at the number of views on posts), and some forum users share very personal details. It's not hard to connect the dots to put together a semi-complete picture of someones profile by a determined agency. Not sure if DIBP peruses this forum, but if they have the time to go through facebook, then why not here as well.
Good point, but many case officers take social media interaction/content of the applicant into consideration when processing a visa. There have been quite a few claims from users on here who've explained that during phone interviews with immigration they were asked why their accounts were private or didn't contain many photos, posts etc. about their relationship with their partner.
 

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Well, I guess Immigration is going to know my secret of liking and commenting on cute cat posts..
 

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Good point, but many case officers take social media interaction/content of the applicant into consideration when processing a visa. There have been quite a few claims from users on here who've explained that during phone interviews with immigration they were asked why their accounts were private or didn't contain many photos, posts etc. about their relationship with their partner.
Well, i don't think DIBP or any other agency can fault someone for keeping their FB account private. I don't post personal pictures or discuss personal topics. My partner doesn't even use it, so it's really a moot point in our case. But I do realize that some use it as evidence of their relationship. My comment was more in general about maintaining privacy.
 

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Good point, but many case officers take social media interaction/content of the applicant into consideration when processing a visa. There have been quite a few claims from users on here who've explained that during phone interviews with immigration they were asked why their accounts were private or didn't contain many photos, posts etc. about their relationship with their partner.
My wife and I recently got one of these "you've been friends for x years" that Facebook likes to do (we don't list relationship status so friends is all we are as far as FB knows). And they quoted how many "likes" we had for each other. Apparently after 13 years together and 8 years of marriage, we have "liked" each other about 10 times. What can I say, it's not our primary means of communication! I hope DIPB looks beyond Facebook...
 

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My wife and I recently got one of these "you've been friends for x years" that Facebook likes to do (we don't list relationship status so friends is all we are as far as FB knows). And they quoted how many "likes" we had for each other. Apparently after 13 years together and 8 years of marriage, we have "liked" each other about 10 times. What can I say, it's not our primary means of communication! I hope DIPB looks beyond Facebook...
Obviously facebook/other social media sites are not DIBP's main concern, but it has come up in phone interviews. As I previously noted, most of these people have been from high risk countries, so being from a low-risk country you probably don't have to worry about it. The evidence you provided is what they're primarily going to look at :)
 

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I took the original post to be about malicious facebook posts, not as a means of verifying relationships.

Like if I post a bunch of hate speech and like/follow a bunch of questionable organizations that are known for hate speech.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I took the original post to be about malicious facebook posts, not as a means of verifying relationships.

Like if I post a bunch of hate speech and like/follow a bunch of questionable organizations that are known for hate speech.
You are correct, that's what this is about.

Mind you, they may also check FB to verify partner visas statements. In fact, anything that's out there in the public domain can be checked.
 
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