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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Bridging visa B refused

Hello guys,
I'm really frustrated as my friend's Bridging visa B got refused due to a lot of information stated that Bridging visa B is really easy to get.
She's on a student visa applying for 485 visa and she wants to travel outside of Australia and the case officer stated this. Some of my friends while waiting for 485 got their bridging visa B easily. This is the first time I saw this.

She's really frustrated as well. So she has to wait until someone died even though she got Bridging visa A?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If she's on a stident visa why does she need a bridging visa?

Does the student visa expire when she's planning to be offshore?

Just apply for another BVB with better evidence of a requirement, they are easy to get as long as the criteria is met..
Yes, the student visa will expire when she's planning to be offshore.
But she wants to come back to her country to visit the cousin's wedding and family reunion. But the CO required Compassionate reasons...
 

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Hi,

I am new here and currently have kind of the same dilemma:

I applied for a student visa on May 9, 2018. Once I finished all remaining requirements like medical checks, I decided to go home to my country whilst waiting for the visa. So I purchased a ticket for May 28 returning end of June. Now, I knew that I was supposed to apply for a BVB before leaving, however, I was so stupid on not researching first how long I have to do it before I really need to leave. Long story short, I applied for the BVB two days before I left and got declined.

My saving grace was that I get approved with my student visa. Which I did, I got the grant on the 20th June.

Now my question is, will I have any issues returning to Australia with this visa since I left the country and the BVB got declined?

I have read somewhere that they will allow entry since you now have a valid visa, however I just want to confirm just in case they detain me and not allow entry since I left the country without the bridging visa b.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thank you,
Febie
 

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Hi,

I am new here and currently have kind of the same dilemma:

I applied for a student visa on May 9, 2018. Once I finished all remaining requirements like medical checks, I decided to go home to my country whilst waiting for the visa. So I purchased a ticket for May 28 returning end of June. Now, I knew that I was supposed to apply for a BVB before leaving, however, I was so stupid on not researching first how long I have to do it before I really need to leave. Long story short, I applied for the BVB two days before I left and got declined.

My saving grace was that I get approved with my student visa. Which I did, I got the grant on the 20th June.

Now my question is, will I have any issues returning to Australia with this visa since I left the country and the BVB got declined?

I have read somewhere that they will allow entry since you now have a valid visa, however I just want to confirm just in case they detain me and not allow entry since I left the country without the bridging visa b.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thank you,
Febie
If you were granted the student visa then that is the visa that is now in effect and you can do whatever the conditions of that visa allow, including travel. The bridging visa would have ceased and is no longer relevant. You should confirm in VEVO that this is the case.
 

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Hi all,

just wondering if everyone has been able to apply for the bridging visa B through ImmiAccount?
For some reason the application for this visa does not show up in my ImmiAccount. The only bridging visa that shows up is bridging visa E.

Should I apply by post? My travel date is the 20 of August so there's still more than a month but I'm worried that the application through mail can delay the process..

Thanks for your help!
 

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Hello guys,
I'm really frustrated as my friend's Bridging visa B got refused due to a lot of information stated that Bridging visa B is really easy to get.
She's on a student visa applying for 485 visa and she wants to travel outside of Australia and the case officer stated this. Some of my friends while waiting for 485 got their bridging visa B easily. This is the first time I saw this.

She's really frustrated as well. So she has to wait until someone died even though she got Bridging visa A?
Hye Ringu412,

I know this post few months back but Im wondering, what is the outcome of your friend's bvb application? Did she manage to travel and get bvb? How? I hope that you can help because i intend to travel next month to gain more knowledge in a religious centre. But i want to know what is the status of your friend's bvb application since the immigration said that she must have a compassionate reason to travel such as close relative ill, died.

Thank you in advance 😉
 

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Here is an outline of the current policy. There is much more to it:

Substantial reason and genuine need for travel
The migration legislation does not define "substantial" in the BVB context. The ordinary dictionary meanings of "substantial" that are relevant in this context are "real", "actual", "important" and "of real worth or value". Officers must bear in mind the above dictionary meanings of "substantial" and apply them in two ways to the assessment of the criterion:
is the reason for wishing to travel substantial – that is, is it important, of real worth or value and
is the need to travel genuine – that is, is it real and actual
It is departmental policy that both these aspects are assessed and satisfied. For example, if a person applied for a BVB on the basis that their parent was very sick they would have a substantial reason for wishing to travel. However, if an investigation of the department's systems indicated that the parent was in Australia there would not be an associated genuine need to leave Australia.
However, departmental policy should not be applied inflexibly and each application should be assessed on its individual merits.
Substantial reason for wishing to travel
A substantial reason for wishing to travel would include travel associated with:
the person's employment, business or education - for example:
attending work or study conferences
participating in business negotiations or meetings
undertaking academic research or presenting papers
or
the person's family, other relatives or other person important to the person - for example:
visiting a seriously ill family member, relative or close friend
attending the wedding, or other culturally important event, of a family member relative or close friend
attending the funeral of a family member, relative or close friend
or
the person's substantive visa application - for example:
undergoing medical treatment for an existing condition
obtaining documentation needed to satisfy legal criteria
resolving custody issues relating to a claimed family unit member
travelling outside Australia for personal reasons (including having a holiday) because the processing or review of their substantive visa application has been protracted.
The above examples are given as a guide to the types of reasons that could be considered and are not exhaustive. Officers must use their judgment when deciding if they are satisfied that the person's reasons for wishing to travel are substantial and document the reasons for their decision. Claims of processing delays may be considered
If the person claims that they are being adversely affected by delays in visa processing or merits or judicial review relating to the substantive visa application, officers should verify these claims by checking:
systems and client records and
visa processing times published on the departmental/review tribunal websites
to ascertain if visa processing, merits review or judicial review times are within published service standards. If it appears that the processing or review of the substantive visa application is protracted, this can be a factor in assessing whether the person has substantial reasons for travel. See also Substantial reason for wishing to travel.
Genuine need to travel
In assessing whether the need to travel is genuine (actually exists), officers can request evidence to support the claim. Depending on the circumstances, such evidence might include (but is not limited to) the BVB applicant's passport and any of the following that may be relevant:
if the travel relates to the person's employment or education:
a letter from the employer verifying that the travel is for work-related purposes or
a letter from the educational institution verifying the travel is for purposes associated with study or research
or
if the travel relates to the person's medical treatment:
a letter from the applicant's medical practitioner or specialist advising that the travel is to undertake medical treatment outside Australia
or
if the travel relates to the illness of a third party (for example a relative or other person important to the person) and the officer has reasonable doubts about the claim:
a medical certificate or similar evidence attesting that the person is sick - if the medical system of the relevant country allows for such written evidence to be provided or
in other cases, a declaration attesting to the illness of the person - either made as a statutory declaration or made in front of, and witnessed by, a departmental officer
if the travel relates to other personal reasons, evidence to support the need to travel - for example evidence of a wedding or other significant celebration in respect of a family member, relative or other person who is important to the person.
The above examples are given as a guide only and are not exhaustive. Officers must use their judgment when deciding if they are satisfied that the person has a genuine need to travel and document the reasons for their decision.
If supporting evidence is not available
In some circumstances, the person may not be able to provide supporting evidence within the relevant decision-making timeframe - for example, they are travelling at short notice to attend a funeral. In such circumstances, it may not be appropriate, or feasible, to request supporting evidence (such as of the death or funeral arrangements).
If the provision of supporting evidence is not appropriate or is not feasible, officers should use their judgment, based on what information is available, to decide if they are satisfied there is a genuine need to travel and document the reasons for their decision.
Period of travel requested
If evidence of the need to travel is requested, officers should ask that the evidence indicate the approximate date of departure from and re-entry to Australia. Officers should assess whether the requested period is consistent with the person's circumstances, in particular that the period of absence from Australia does not exceed the expected remaining processing time for the substantive visa application. See Travel facility period of a BVB. If the period granted is different from that requested, officers should document the reasons for this.

Single entry or multiple entry
Section 5(1) of the Act provides that 'enter' includes re-enter. Therefore, the term 'enter Australia' implies multiple entries. Unless there is good reason in a specific case for granting single-entry travel only, officers should grant a multiple-entry BVB.
If officers are unsure whether the circumstances might warrant single-entry only, they should discuss this with the officer responsible for assessing the associated substantive visa application. If it is decided to grant a single-entry BVB in a particular case, the reasons for this should be documented.
Whether a single or a multiple-entry BVB is granted, the overall travel facility period should align with the person's circumstances and reasons for travel. See also BVB visa period and travel facility period.
Return not contrary to public interest
About the requirements
Clause 020.213 is an "at time of application" criterion that requires the delegate to be satisfied that the BVB applicant's return to Australia would not be contrary to the public interest.
 

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Hi all,

just wondering if everyone has been able to apply for the bridging visa B through ImmiAccount?
For some reason the application for this visa does not show up in my ImmiAccount. The only bridging visa that shows up is bridging visa E.

Should I apply by post? My travel date is the 20 of August so there's still more than a month but I'm worried that the application through mail can delay the process..

Thanks for your help!
Did you end up finding it? I can't find it in my account either :(
 
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