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Thanks Mish.

I have a related question.
I'm an Aus citizen, will be arriving with my husband (PR subclass 100 holder) and our two kids, around May/June next year. We will have a healthy amount of savings to land on our feet (more than $20k, less than $100k) and are hoping not to rely on centrelink for anything. So the reason I am asking this is not because we can't wait to get there so we can claim payments (in case anyone jumps to that conclusion) - it is purely in case of a worst case scenario if he can't find a job for a longer than expected period of time (unfortunately I don't earn enough to support the whole family).

I know that years ago when I first looked into the partner visa for him the story was that the permanent partner visa was exempt from the 2 year waiting period for Centrelink. Is that still the case does anyone know?
 

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This is a complicated area and it was said in a court my ex was getting Centerlink payments (by her) - but I don't know how that is possible.
 

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How does this affect someone on a partner visa? When does it start counting? 2/3 years from the date permanent resident is approved or 2/3 years from when you first arrive?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I know that years ago when I first looked into the partner visa for him the story was that the permanent partner visa was exempt from the 2 year waiting period for Centrelink. Is that still the case does anyone know?
My understanding is that they are only exempt for certain benefits like family tax benefit, parenting payments etc. I believe that things like newstart allowance are not exempt.

I think it will be more clear when/if this comes in.

Also, you as an Australian citizen would be able to claim all benefits anyway, it would be your husband that may not be able to claim certain benefits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
How does this affect someone on a partner visa? When does it start counting? 2/3 years from the date permanent resident is approved or 2/3 years from when you first arrive?
It would not affect them if they are already on a partner visa and in Australia as the news article said people that arrive after July 2018.
 

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How does this affect someone on a partner visa? When does it start counting? 2/3 years from the date permanent resident is approved or 2/3 years from when you first arrive?
Newstart Benefit is 2 years after getting PR.

That means that my wife would be eligible in about May 2020, she will have been here for about 5 years by then...

I did notice that report mentions: Those bringing relatives over to Australia on a family visa will also need to guarantee their financial independence for three years.

The bit that says: The extended waiting time will apply to <...> Family Tax Benefit, is puzzling, as I thought there was no waiting time for FTB.

Current Rules: New residents may have to wait 104 weeks before they can get most of our payments or use our services. This doesn't apply to family assistance payments. https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/enablers/newly-arrived-residents-waiting-period
 

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Thanks Mish.

I have a related question.
I'm an Aus citizen, will be arriving with my husband (PR subclass 100 holder) and our two kids, around May/June next year. We will have a healthy amount of savings to land on our feet (more than $20k, less than $100k) and are hoping not to rely on centrelink for anything. So the reason I am asking this is not because we can't wait to get there so we can claim payments (in case anyone jumps to that conclusion) - it is purely in case of a worst case scenario if he can't find a job for a longer than expected period of time (unfortunately I don't earn enough to support the whole family).

I know that years ago when I first looked into the partner visa for him the story was that the permanent partner visa was exempt from the 2 year waiting period for Centrelink. Is that still the case does anyone know?
This was indeed the case up until January 2017. Holders of sc.100 or 801 visas were exempt from the Newly Arrived Residents' Waiting Period. For people on the temporary 309 or the 820 visas, they became eligible for Centrelink support only once they got their permanent residency but didn't have to wait an extra two years on top of that.

Now from what I understand of the changes, people who applied for the 820 onshore face a very long wait before they are eligible for any assistance; 2 years after the initial 820/801 application they become eligible for PR, another 1-2 years later it's granted and then another 2 years later they have finished the NARWP. Total 5-6 years, which is far harsher compared to people who arrive with PR.

So while the situation is less supportive than before, be thankful your partner is arriving with a permanent visa

See the section 'Exemption from the NARWP' in the below link:

3.1.2.70 Exemptions from Waiting Periods | Guide to Social Security Law
 
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Also, you as an Australian citizen would be able to claim all benefits anyway, it would be your husband that may not be able to claim certain benefits.
This is not exactly true, as the partner's status determines how much the Australian partner can claim and also how much will be deducted from her payment when she earns income through work.

Obviously she can only claim at the reduced partnered rate, but in addition to this the amount you can earn before your payment is reduced - and by how much - is very different if you fall under the category 'Partner doesn't get a Centrelink pension', even if they have no income.

See https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/enablers/income-and-assets-tests-parenting-payment

eg. if the Australian partner receives Parenting Payment and her partner IS receiving a Centrelink pension, then on top of the double pension, the couple only lose 25c then 30c in the dollar for every dollar earnt above $208 / $508 per fortnight.

If the foreign partner is ineligible and thus NOT receiving a Centrelink pension (and has no work), then even if the Australian partner works, the family will lose 50c then 60c in the dollar for every dollar she earns over $104 / $254 per fortnight.

This makes it really hard for the Australian partner working part time (for instance mothers of young children) to support a partner who hasn't found work, as they are only better off to the tune of 40% of any income earned, up until they earn $953 a fortnight, at which point the parenting payment drops out altogether.
 
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