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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

My partner and I are beginning the partnership visa process and we are wondering whether or not to spring for a migration agent to represent us. If we decide not to hire one, can anyone shed some light on what might be some common reasons why people get denied a partnership visa? We want to provide as much detailed information as possible for the visa application, and we were wondering if anyone knows some common reasons applications get denied so we know if we should hire someone to represent us or not. Also, does anyone know what usually happens if information is missing or considered insufficient? Do they generally deny the application straight away or do they contact us and give us a chance to provide additional documentation? Also, is there a specific format or form that our witnesses who write letters on our behalf should use?

Thanks again!

Lizzie
 

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You should start by getting faniliar with the visa website at the Department of Home Affairs. There are many sublinks within the list of requirements the explain everything.

Common pitfalls, not supplying enough of the right kind of evidence required, not supplying required documents, failing a medical or character check, and not preparing thoroughly before applying (you need to show your relationship to a complete stranger which requires organization and planning to do it properly.).

It's hard to comment on as there are many things you should know before applying. Step 1 comes with following the DoHA checklist and using this forum to clear confusion. Do your research first and then ask as you go.
 

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Immigration does not need to contact you asking for required items you failed to upload. If they do (and this is a big IF since apparently after Nov 2017 they have saif they'll stop doing it), then it is a courtesy and you would be lucky they didn't flat out refuse you. There's really no excuse for not submitting all required documentation when applying as the information on what is required is listed, explained, and readily available via the visa information website.

The only things you have the option of not supplying straight away and they will request from you when ready are police checks and the medical. The reason is because they are only valid for 12 months and supplying them too early may require them to be completed again due to long visa processing times taking longer than 12 months, especially for onshore apps.

Form 888 is explained on the website and the form itself.

https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/trav...a-(subclasses-820-and-801)-document-checklist
 

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It suddenly hit me!

DoHA

Homer Simpson.

Sorry yes yet to learn the system a bit first, honestly a goog application will take a couple of months to be ready to apply.

An agent cannot just get you a visa, you still need to give them the info/data - they don't make it up for you.

So see how it pans out, then decide if you need an agent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You should start by getting faniliar with the visa website at the Department of Home Affairs. There are many sublinks within the list of requirements the explain everything.

Common pitfalls, not supplying enough of the right kind of evidence required, not supplying required documents, failing a medical or character check, and not preparing thoroughly before applying (you need to show your relationship to a complete stranger which requires organization and planning to do it properly.).

It's hard to comment on as there are many things you should know before applying. Step 1 comes with following the DoHA checklist and using this forum to clear confusion. Do your research first and then ask as you go.
Hello! Thank-you for your advice! My partner and I have done quite a bit of research and are trying to make decisions. We understand that the agent won't do it for us, we were just wondering if people in general have found it helpful to pay the extra money to have one advise them and, in the process of making the decision, my partner mentioned that maybe we should ask if there are any repetitive reasons why people get denied. We will only have lived together for 12 months when we apply, so we weren't sure if people commonly get denied for that reason, or if people often have trouble showing evidence of sharing finances, or not enough detail in their witness statements, etc. and if maybe hiring our own agent would be helpful to help us build a stronger case. We just thought it might be helpful if anyone had insights about what people commonly struggle with. But we get what you're saying that there's a lot to consider and we will keep doing our research. We are just getting nervous as my current visa is running out of time! Also, thank-you for letting us know that they don't have to contact us and could just deny us if we don't supply information that meets their standards. That is helpful (and terrifying!)

So thankful for this community!

Lizzie
 

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we were just wondering if people in general have found it helpful to pay the extra money to have one advise them
We did the PMV ourselves, but so often during the long wait, I did wonder if we should have used an agent, even if just to check it before we submitted it.

As it happens it was granted, and I know so much more now than back in 2015, so I feel OK doing the final 801 stage soon (At least I think I feel OK at the moment).

If you are a worrier, then getting an RMA to check it before submission might be a great idea.
One of those listed at: http://www.australiaforum.com/visas-immigration/252474-registered-migration-agents.html might be a good recommendation. Especially with the new rules on needing everything submitted on time.
 

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One of the things a good registered migration agent will do (in addition to ensuring that forms are filled out correctly, requirements are met and supporting evidence is up to scratch) is to provide a detailed submission setting out how legal requirements are met and why the visa should be granted.This can be crucial, especially since there seem to be so many inexperienced staff nowadays who may be missing vital evidence.

Another advantage of using an agent is that you will not need to deal with the Department directly and be worried that you miss emails or deadlines. Your agent will monitor all progress until a decision has been made on the application.
 
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