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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

So, it's coming to the time to hit submit. We have our evidence, it's been thoroughly looked over about a million times and we are confident that we will be supplying the DIBP with more than enough evidence for a successful grant.

However, after talking a little last night, we are wondering whether we should go with offshore (as we've been preparing for) or onshore. My partner just lost her job here in Canada and since the plan is to head to Australia, she's thinking of going ahead and getting things set up for us there. Now, obviously the idea of being apart for 3, 6 or even 12 months is not ideal; we don't want to be apart, who in our situation does? So I wanted some advice from the knowledgeable folks around here, perhaps from those who have been in a similar situation themselves.

I currently have a visitor visa (ETA) and it is set to expire in March, 2018 (keep in mind, I've entered and left Australia on that visa already) and we are wondering, if she's going to go back in March anyways, should we just apply onshore for the 820?

I know the processing time is much longer, but from what I understand (because of my current visa) once we apply for the 820, I will be given a bridging visa (not sure if it's BVA or BVB) and that visa will allow me to work while we wait on a decision.

My question is this - does that bridging visa (from visitor to partner) actually allow me to work in Australia while our application is being processed? If so, can I still enroll in medicare?

Another question, as we plan to stay in Australia for the foreseeable future, is this - once we are working and have more money saved, does the likelihood of me getting a home loan with my partner go down because I'm on a bridging visa?

I know I have asked questions similar to this, but we are getting to the point where we need to make a choice. Thanks for looking and thanks for your advice and help.
 

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I currently have a visitor visa (ETA) and it is set to expire in March, 2018 (keep in mind, I've entered and left Australia on that visa already) and we are wondering, if she's going to go back in March anyways, should we just apply onshore for the 820?
Ultimately,it is a matter of personal choice.Keep in mind the possibility that from next year on the sponsorship may have to be approved first. This could be problematic if the stay period of your tourist visa expires in the meantime.

Eh?;1723282I know the processing time is much longer said:
actually[/I] allow me to work in Australia while our application is being processed? If so, can I still enroll in medicare?
You will have full work rights once your tourist visa ceases and the bridging visa come into effect.You should be able to enrol in Medicare as soon as the onshore partner visa application has been lodged.

Another question, as we plan to stay in Australia for the foreseeable future, is this - once we are working and have more money saved, does the likelihood of me getting a home loan with my partner go down because I'm on a bridging visa?
It is my understanding that financial institutions will no longer provide home loans to people on temporary visas, so your partner may have to get the loan in her own right.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ultimately,it is a matter of personal choice.Keep in mind the possibility that from next year on the sponsorship may have to be approved first. This could be problematic if the stay period of your tourist visa expires in the meantime.

You will have full work rights once your tourist visa ceases and the bridging visa come into effect.You should be able to enrol in Medicare as soon as the onshore partner visa application has been lodged.

It is my understanding that financial institutions will no longer provide home loans to people on temporary visas, so your partner may have to get the loan in her own right.
As always, thank you for the advice, Nick. I really appreciate it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Ultimately,it is a matter of personal choice.

It is my understanding that financial institutions will no longer provide home loans to people on temporary visas, so your partner may have to get the loan in her own right.
So, even if I apply offshore for 309 and am granted that, I wouldn't be eligible for a home loan until my permanent visa is granted?
 

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So, even if I apply offshore for 309 and am granted that, I wouldn't be eligible for a home loan until my permanent visa is granted?
I am not qualified to give financial advice, but I asked a finance broker about it a while ago and I got the impression that only Australian PR/ citizens could get home loans. Happy to chase it up for you and get some clear advice on the current lending rules.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am not qualified to give financial advice, but I asked a finance broker about it a while ago and I got the impression that only Australian PR/ citizens could get home loans. Happy to chase it up for you and get some clear advice on the current lending rules.
Thanks, Nick.

I'll reach out via email after I speak to my partner about this. Much appreciated!
 

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I have heard the same - I believe there were some threads about it a while back that banks have tightened the rules around lending such that only citizens and PR holders are eligible. If you do a search you might be able to find the threads where other members discussed it.
 

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I received some advice on this, which I am happy to share privately. I am not qualified to provide financial advice, so will not share this information in a public domain.
 
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