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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

My OH had his medical last week and they noted 2 issues:

1. A high blood pressure of around 162/90 although we've taken it several times since at home and it's been much lower around 135-145/78-90. I am almost certain it was due to the stress of the medical.

2. A trace of blood in the urine.

The doctor informed our GP of the 2 issues and requested a more detailed urine test. The OH visited the GP and we are awaiting the results of the more detailed urine sample. The doctor mentioned the high blood pressure but did not request further tests.

I am wondering if this is a major cause for concern and a reason for rejection of the spousal visa as everything else in the medical was fine.

A bit of background is that he is almost 60, UK-native and a qualified doctor.

It wasn't clear what the next steps were and my OH was a bit stressed and didn't ask!

Any advice would be appreciated!
 

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High blood pressure is not a reason for rejection, but they will need to rule out hypertensive complications. Blood in may be any from inflammation to infection, which is insignificant and can be easy treated. There maybe other causes of blood in urine which could be serious. A detailed urine test will identify these.
 

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Good luck with your application. The answer to your question is no. HBP is easily managed with medication. My brother he is only 30 and was diagnose with HBP about 9 years ago when he first came over to study here. He has graduated and went back to Singapore as he got a job. He applied for skilled migration offshore around early December last year and he got approved sometime last month February. Very quick.
 

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My husband has high blood pressure (managed with medication) and type 2 diabetes (also managed effectively with diet and a very cheap medication called metformin). Our immigration agent told us not to be concerned with either of those conditions as they are managed cheaply and are not severe and uncontrolled (uncontrolled diabetes can lead to organ failure), but hubby is nowhere close to that and actually has no complications and both conditions were only discovered initially because he was military and they showed up in the routine yearly physical.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Unfortunately things have not gone as expected. Although the immigration doctor did not request more bp readings, she called on Friday to say there were required. Poor communication but there you go. My question concerns timings. If my OH has to go on medication to reduce it, how long will immigration wait? We applied in November 2013 and were told we could only have the medical from March 2014 due to high application volumes and the entire process would take 8/9 months. I don't know how long bp medication takes to work but imagine it's 2/3 months from now, would immigration get suspicious that we were able to have the medical from March but they hear nothing until June or later? Just to explain the immigration doctor says they won't submit our results until everything is low enough to pass. Say the medical results are all sorted by July, can we still expect to get a final decision by September?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for reply. I suppose the question was moreso if the steps taken by the CO are set eg. Step 1 is to get medical, step 2 is to check stat decs, step 3 check police report. Appreciate it's all in the hands of the CO but wondered if there was a set process. I'm guessing not! Best regards.
 

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Hmm Yeh I think it would only be speculation. I've never seen anything posted that suggests there is a set timeline of what gets done when. Hopefully it will all be sorted soon! Our medicals are also delayed due to not being able to get into a specialist. Frustrating!
 

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Thanks for reply. I suppose the question was moreso if the steps taken by the CO are set eg. Step 1 is to get medical, step 2 is to check stat decs, step 3 check police report. Appreciate it's all in the hands of the CO but wondered if there was a set process. I'm guessing not! Best regards.
No, afraid not.
 

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Beta blockers work very quickly so your tests should be low enough for submission very soon.

As to your question on timelines, I imagine most COs have their own system, but I don't think a small delay in submission of the final results of your medical will pose a significant problem. You can explain that you had a high bp reading and needed to give medication time to become effective before retaking your tests. I imagine this occurs a lot as your medical doctor seemed quite blasé about the situation.
 

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Hi, I have recently submitted my visa application under Skilled Independent Visa (subclass 189) and I am due to get my medical done.
I was diagnosed with diabetes in 2012 and I am controlling it via diet. Now, I am worried if me being diabetic will mean denial of visa. I need your expert advise to know if any diabetic has got visa? Please help.
 

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Hi, I have recently submitted my visa application under Skilled Independent Visa (subclass 189) and I am due to get my medical done.
I was diagnosed with diabetes in 2012 and I am controlling it via diet. Now, I am worried if me being diabetic will mean denial of visa. I need your expert advise to know if any diabetic has got visa? Please help.
Can anyone please help?
 

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Yes, many diabetics have been granted visas, especially those who don't even need medication. It's entirely dependent on how well-controlled your case is. They're only concerned about people whose medical treatment they predict will cost the system $40,000 or more over five years. Your panel doctor may require a report from your specialist, but it shouldn't keep you from getting a visa. If you want to be sure, you can contact a migration agent who specializes in medical cases, like George Lombard or Peter Bollard.
 

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In permanent resident applications, the medical authorities will assess the likely lifetime costs of an identified medical condition.

May I suggest that you take professional advice about dealing with this?
 

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Thank you will do. I have just heard from various forums that diabities as long as it is controlled and does not lead to other failures is fine. Will check though
 
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