Australia Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
21 - 25 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Many people expect that for some reason, they will arrive in Australia, and there will be 100s of companies calling them to offer big fat salaries, while they are sitting on the beach.
Why do you think it would be easier to succeed in Australia than any other country ?
To be realistic, and avoid disappointment, consider that you will have to start all over again from zero after you have moved to Aus.
That is easier to achieve when you are younger, that is also why they encourage younger than 30 yo foreigners to migrate.
Yes there are people who somehow seem to manage well without facing any difficulty. They find a permanent job after 2 weeks only, they are not smarter than you, not more experienced or better educated than you, and the company even sponsors them. I know a few such people.
Whatever. It doesn't mean they will always be more successful and happier than you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
Hi All,

I myself is not practising the job that I have in my home country however, changes in my resume details, review on the current workforce, and read on how to present further myself when doing the interviews made a big difference to land on a permanent job here in Australia. I can say that do not give up, explore other options and work on what you can improve so that when the interview pops up, it will be easy.

Hope this helps..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Hi,

I'm a professional resume writer and jobsearch trainer and also new to this forum.I worked for over five years in Employment Services as a consultant.

My advice for people moving to Australia from other countries whose qualifications aren't recognised here, is to not step too outside of the industry they have developed their high skills in. I've witnessed a few doctors and teachers etc feel they need to look for work as a cleaner (etc). But I urge these jobseekers to look for related jobs that gives them a foot in the door to the industry they know and love. E.g. Teachers could apply for teacher's aid or tutoring positions, doctors and nurses etc can attempt to gain work in a hospital or medical centre (albeit in a reduced capacity until they complete the requirements of a bridging course to gain appropriate qualification to work in that field in Australia).

The thing is to consider the skills they already have, and to find positions where their higher knowledge and skills is kept fresh.

The person doesn't have to take such a huge downward career step is what I'm encouraging.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
I made the permanent move to Australia in May 2013 and had to take a job that was not related to my field of study at all.

I have a Master's degree and am currently trying to finish my PhD, but found it very difficult to find any jobs in my profession (which is a very popular field with diverse job opportunities and new positions being posted daily). With regard to all the jobs I applied for (that I was qualified for, and over qualified for) I did not hear back from a single one.

To me, it has all been about networking. The job I got when I first moved here was within sales, and far from the field I've spent about 10 years studying/working within and have an excellent, recognized degree from. But you need to live, you need money, and I don't mind honest work while settling in a new country.

I NEVER gave up on my actual profession though, and nurtured connections with people within my field, attended social mixers etc. and made sure I was on the top of people's mind when a new opportunity came up. I would encourage anyone, immigrant or Australian, to do the same.

As a result I am now, 1,5 years later, finally starting to get to where I want to be. I still work in the sales job, but only part-time for some extra cash flow, and have been lucky to get several opportunities within my field of study (none full time though, all appointment based - but that is a general problem with my industry) and have recently been appointed a part-time position that I know will get me further in the door and really open up some opportunities for full time.

In general, my income while in Australia has dropped about 50% from what I had before I made the move. But then, money is not happiness (and the income in Norway is generally higher than the Australian).

I guess my advise is to expect that you will have to start over to a certain extent, but that does not mean you don't have valuable experience that will be appreciated. And to just be a bit smart about making connections - identify opportunities where you live and who you might want to get in touch with in order to get things back on track.

Never give up!

:)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Elmo
21 - 25 of 25 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top