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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

My partner and I are collecting some documents to put on a partner visa application. He is an Australian citizen and I'm a Canadian.

We had our landlord write us a letter stating the details of our relationship and how long we lived together at his place. My landlord was going to take the letter to get a certified witness to sign it with him. In this case he would show his ID to the certified witness confirming that it was my landlord who wrote it.

Anyways, I wanted to make sure we were doing everything right for this declaration so I did a search on the Department of Home Affairs website. I came across form 888. In it I found out that we need a certified copy of my landlords passport or birth certificate submitted with the form.

Are you kidding me!? Is this for real?

I wouldn't even pass a certified copy of my birth certificate to a friend of 20 years! This is incredibly personal information to request from anyone and most people don't even want to store their ID on their computer.

How important is it to get a certified copy of a friend or landlords ID? Is it not enough that a prescribed person will see my landlords ID and witness him signing the declaration?

There are several other friends who would write a declaration too but they are totally the type of people who will never scan their ID nor would they pass a certified copy of their ID to anyone.
 

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I think the instructions on Form 888 are very clear. In 12 years of practice I have never had anybody object to providing their ID.

Obviously all official parties dealing with the documentation have privacy and confidentiality obligations.
 

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Realistically, there's nothing on the passport or citizenship certificate of our friends or family that we don't already know about them (birthdays, full names, place of birth) and besides that, we trust each other as friends.

If they have an issue with it, why not just use their computer to log into immi and upload the documents? You can't access files once they've been uploaded so no way to see it or save a copy of it.

I'm not sure about the landlord statement but any Form 888s that we got, we made sure to supply their identification of citizenship.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's just that collecting anyones ID is private information. This isn't so much a trust issue between friends, it is that many people fear of computer systems being hacked with their identity stolen.

Plus I've only known my landlord for half a year. This is a HUGE ask...

I just recently saw in another post that someone included a letter stating that their friend wouldn't submit their ID over the internet for privacy reasons and that if needed the processing office could call the declarant for further clarifications. Could I not just include this?

Could a declarant maybe submit it themselves directly to immigration by providing my application number? My landlord is miles away from me now for me to log into his computer to submit his id there.
 

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It's just that collecting anyones ID is private information. This isn't so much a trust issue between friends, it is that many people fear of computer systems being hacked with their identity stolen.

Plus I've only known my landlord for half a year. This is a HUGE ask...

I just recently saw in another post that someone included a letter stating that their friend wouldn't submit their ID over the internet for privacy reasons and that if needed the processing office could call the declarant for further clarifications. Could I not just include this?

Could a declarant maybe submit it themselves directly to immigration by providing my application number? My landlord is miles away from me now for me to log into his computer to submit his id there.
I think you may be worrying quite unnecessarily, most Australians are quite used to submitting certified ID to the Commonwealth Government for any number of reasons. As a Justice of the Peace I am frequently called on to certify papers for just such purposes.
 

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Are you living in Australia or Canada? The Form 888s are only valid for submission by Australian citizens.

You don’t need the landlord to submit a Form 888, it can be a statutory declaration if you prefer. But you will still need at least two Australian citizens to provide Form 888s for you.

I found it easiest to just leave my privacy concerns at the door when it came to this process, as even the most intimate relationship details are subject to scrutiny.

Honestly I think that providing a certified copy of a passport to the Australian government (i.e. the same authority which issues and retains ownership of all Australia passports) is a pretty low risk venture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi Everyone. Thank you so much for replying back on this and for the advice.

I'll see what my landlord can do. This is an important piece to my application because we don't have too much to prove for our defacto relationship during the period of time we lived at my former landlords location.

Missmullen- I'm living in Australia on a student visa and my former landlord is Australian. We could at least use the letter that we have from him as proof that we paid rent and stayed at the same address in case he can't submit form 888 with his ID attached.
 

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If you are concerned about privacy, be aware that Migration may check social media and also may scrutinise people’s mobile phones, laptops and other devices.

Your landlord can just do a stat. dec or a simple statement instead of a form 888. He should provide contact details and it is definitely a good idea to include some ID, even if it is only a driver’s licence. Forms 888 carry more weight though.

The Department sets the rules. They are not going to go out of their way to accommodate applicants with privacy concerns, I can guarantee you that.

The choice is yours.
 

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If you are concerned about privacy, be aware that Migration may check social media and also may scrutinise people's mobile phones, laptops and other devices.
.
Hi there!
I was just surprised by your answer.. how can they "scrutinise people's mobile phones, laptops and other devices"?
And I really mean how? (by what mean/ what occasion?)

Thank you for your enlightment :)

Julie
 

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Hi there!
I was just surprised by your answer.. how can they "scrutinise people's mobile phones, laptops and other devices"?
And I really mean how? (by what mean/ what occasion?)

Thank you for your enlightment :)

Julie
Don't really know exactly how that works , but i know they can have access. When one applies for the Partner Visa, in the online 47sp there is a clause that must be signed authorising the department obtaining information from telecommunication and internet service providers. So I'm guessing that they can ask the telcos to provide with whatever information such as phone call logs, email, or messages details.
 

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Hi there!
I was just surprised by your answer.. how can they "scrutinise people's mobile phones, laptops and other devices"?
And I really mean how? (by what mean/ what occasion?)

Thank you for your enlightment :)

Julie
Under section 186 of the Commonwealth Customs Act ( 1901) they can search electronic devices including laptops and phones.
Anyone appearing at the border seeking entry is subject to this provision. If you fail to co operate, they can confiscate you devices, and download whatever they like.
 

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Hi there!
I was just surprised by your answer.. how can they "scrutinise people's mobile phones, laptops and other devices"?
And I really mean how? (by what mean/ what occasion?)

Thank you for your enlightment :)

Julie
If they suspect you may not be entering for the purpose of your visa, they can request you hand them your phone (or tablet or laptop, etc.) and unlock it so they can review your email, text messages, etc. They have the power to confiscate your devices if you refuse.
 
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