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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I haven't posted on here for a while. I've been dating my girlfriend for 2 years now and we are currently doing long distance. I'm an AU citizen. She is from Japan.

I'm still a student so I'm not financially well off at all. When she was here in Australia, we never had any joint bank accounts and we didn't live together (i.e. no shared rental lease).

I'm looking at potentially proposing sometime within the next year or so and to apply for a PMV and then to transition to a partner visa for her.

I was wondering for you guys, what evidence have yo guys had?

The evidence I have:
- many receipts of meals we've had together (obviously they don't have both our names on them)
- bank transfers between each other
- airbnb receipts (but not with her name)
- Travel tickets (with her name)
- some letters/cards/gifts from her
- many photos of us in the same place and having meals together


I'm asking this because I know that the application fee for the PMV+partner visa is very expensive and I know my relationship is genuine.

My girlfriend and I have never been the type to post on our social media accounts (facebook, instagram) about how much we love each other and how much we miss each other, we just do our own thing.

Would people who've had experience with this be able to give me some advice on how to approach this? I'd really appreciate it as long distance is pretty tough and I'd love to have some support especially since I'm going through a tough situation outside of this relationship.


Thanks so much.
 

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There's no requirement to ever have lived together for the PMV.

Photos of you with other people is good to show the relationship is known to others, an proof of holidays together or staycations (sometimes my partner and I just get a hotel in the city and go to a show and dinner for the night), messages between each other and/or proof that you contact each other (video chat/phone call) frequently, proof of purchase for gifts for each other (check bank statements if no receipts) on birthdays or special occasions, if you plan on getting engaged then proof of that (did you do it in public or in front of friends, are there photos of you proposing, did you buy a ring or gift of some sort, etc).

Basically if your relationship is genuine, you just need to prove it for the PMV. No need to have de facto evidence as that is not a requirement for the 300. When my partner and I applied, we had never lived together (we didn't see the occasional 2 week visits where he stayed with me at my place as living together officially), we had been in a long distance relationship so had no combined lives (no joint leases, bank accounts, insurance, and so on).

The partner visa route to Australia is expensive no matter which way you go. The PMV 300 is $7000 but the subsequent 820/801 from a 300 is only $1170 more. Just wanted to point that out as a lot of people assume it's $7k+$7k and it's not.
 

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A PMV requires a very different approach form a partner visa.

Apart from establishing that you have actually met in person and have spent time together, I would concentrate on social recognition of the relationship ( involvement and letters of support from family and friends, especially parents on both sides), cultural acceptance and future plans, evidence of wedding planning etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would concentrate on social recognition of the relationship ( involvement and letters of support from family and friends, especially parents on both sides), cultural acceptance and future plans, evidence of wedding planning etc.
Thanks very much for the replies guys. I wanted to ask about this. This is a bit of an issue because my parents are unaccepting of my relationship simply because of the fact my girlfriend is Japanese (not of the same race as I).

My friends and her friends know of our relationship and they support us. Would there be anything I could do here?
 

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Thanks very much for the replies guys. I wanted to ask about this. This is a bit of an issue because my parents are unaccepting of my relationship simply because of the fact my girlfriend is Japanese (not of the same race as I).

My friends and her friends know of our relationship and they support us. Would there be anything I could do here?
What about her family?

My family was not aware of my relationship as I was not in contact with any of them. I did explain the situation in my statement though and we provided evidence of our relationship being known to others such as friends in both countries and his family. We also had one of our Form 888s from my partner's mother.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What about her family?

My family was not aware of my relationship as I was not in contact with any of them. I did explain the situation in my statement though and we provided evidence of our relationship being known to others such as friends in both countries and his family. We also had one of our Form 888s from my partner's mother.
I am close with my family but my parents have been the typical "tiger parents" (I'm from an asian background) and have been pretty controlling with who I should date (although I am not taking their recommendations).

I don't really talk about my relationship with my parents as it has caused a lot of conflict in the past.

Her mum (my girlfriend doesn't talk to her dad as her parents are divorced) is aware of the relationship and is supportive.
 

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Thanks very much for the replies guys. I wanted to ask about this. This is a bit of an issue because my parents are unaccepting of my relationship simply because of the fact my girlfriend is Japanese (not of the same race as I).

My friends and her friends know of our relationship and they support us. Would there be anything I could do here?
Is there any other family that could provide support ?
 

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My siblings who are over the age of 18 know about my relationship, would that be okay? and if so, what sort of support would they need to provide?
Ideally you will have family members and friends on both sides testifying about the relationship. If parents are not helpful, you may have to cast a wider net.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you, with regards to that, would casting the net further make the statements less credible?

Also with stuff such as evidence of cultural acceptance, what is it meant by that? How would we go about proving that?

Thanks again
 

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Thank you, with regards to that, would casting the net further make the statements less credible?

Also with stuff such as evidence of cultural acceptance, what is it meant by that? How would we go about proving that?

Thanks again
Evidence from parents and close family is best, but ultimately you can only work with what you've got.

Knowledge of each other's cultures, language, religion etc. Its not critical, but evidence of how much effort you have made to get to know the other partner's culture can be a good indication of your level of commitment.
 

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Also with stuff such as evidence of cultural acceptance, what is it meant by that? How would we go about proving that?
Not sure how you could actually prove it, but write about teaching each other your own languages, how you exchange food/cooking ideas, visits to museums, art galleries, music venues, theatres etc., whatever your interests are, basically, you can teach/show/discuss it with each other to heighten cultural awareness in each other.

You probably do it all the time without realising it!
 

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Hi Atenolol,

I was considering you questions and comparing to my situation, My wife recently got her 309 visa approved. We were not married at the time of application but were married 1 month after applying. we also did live together.

As for other evidence, we didn’t have much other than lots of photos, with us, us and friends, also the both of us with our families, and both families together, 2 stat decs from a friend and my sister. We had some random scattered plane tickets aswell.

we also didn’t start posting "lovey dovey" photos on Facebook until a few months before the application when we decided it is probably a good idea.


We were expecting to have a hard time but never had any interview, we just received the visa grant letter.


So! based on my experience, build a story! build a story with the photos you have together. instead of filling out the "relationship section" in detail, refer to an attachment and make a little story document, saying how you met, then stick some photos of then (if you have), then talk about the travel you have done, then stick a scan of the plane tickets and photos of that there..
talk about how you video chat every 2nd night, and stick a screen shot of the skype conversation and screenshots of you chat history showing the dates.

Get as many friends and family members to write stat decs.... if it’s a "dodgy" visa application there is less chance of 10 people wanting to legally put their names down saying a lie. Get them to write in details about they are aware of your future plans. Don’t just get them to write "i know xxx and yyy to be a legitimate couple", Get them to write a 2 page story explaining how they really feel you are a couple.
Get them to write about how you both genuinely have a passion in each others country and culture too (my friend wrote an amazing sentence about how he was always so amazed when he is out with the 2 of us watching us interact in this mixed English/Japanese conversations with each other, that to another person would look so strange but we were so natural about it.)



You asked about cultural acceptance...do you have a photo of you guys having a great time in a Yukata at a festival in Japan? or have you made some effort to study Japanese (not necessary, but things like that show you’re are enjoying the different culture)


just a few ideas for thought.

Aaron
 
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