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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi gentle people!
I'm eligible for Australian citizenship by descent as my mom is Australian but I was born and always lived in Italy. I am seriously considering applicating for it and . I am self employed and my activity has much more potential in AU than here.
Problem: I want to bring my husband of five years and son (3.5 yo now) with me and start this new life together, but I'm afraid I won't meet sponsorship requirements since I am technically unemployed in Australia and can't demonstrate I'll be successful in advance. Even here it's his income that supports our family mostly since my business is still new. My husband doesn't speak much English but is willing to learn and take any kind of work as long as it's honest to provide for us (me I'm confident I can make some money too!!). He's actually aiming to start his own business too so that is an option.
What do you think are our chances for a Partner:confused: Visa given the situation? Is there another route you suggest we take?
I really would like to begin our new life in time for my son to go to first grade in Australia!
Thank you thank you
 

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Hi -

There are no specific income requirements for the partner visa application, and there is no requirement that that income come from Australia, so I think you have an excellent case - I'd proceed with the citizenship application right away. As you have a child together and have been in a long-term relationship, the partner visa application should not be an issue if prepared properly.

Here's a link on citizenship applications for those born overseas to an Australian parent:

Australian Citizenship - Child born overseas to an Australian citizen

If I can provide any further information or assistance, let me know -

Best,

Mark Northam
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello Mark, thank you so much, it is a relief to read this answer!
I was worried because I was collecting info on the Partner Visa and it is stated that the sponsor (that should be me) has to be ready to provide for the partner for the first two years, and though I am mentally ready, I cannot demonstrate that I'll actually be able to. We'll have to wrap up our business/job here in Italy and sell everything we have before coming to have enough money to support us for at least the first months, so we're coming with virtually nothing. Should I check with immigration authorities that we can actually have a chance before changing all of our lives or should I just go for it? thank you so much again!
 

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There is no minimum income to be a sponsor! So don't worry :)

Become a citizen first, then start working on your plan of approach for the partner visa. As Mark said it looks like you have an excellent chance!

Your partner is not required to have a certain level of English to come over on a partner visa. But from one mainland-European immigrant to another for his sake I recommend him to take some English classes now while he can. If not for him to build confidence to speak it every day - at least to increase his chances at work. Australia is a very tolerant country but having lived here for a year now I still feel like a bit of an outsider because I still don't understand everything all the time (I'm not used to the accent at all!) and your husband will feel much more confident once he is onshore if he knows he can keep up and show his true skill. Just advice, though :) good luck!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thank you Nelly! Yes he's destined to attend English classes in the immediate future and I have decided to only speak english to him in the house. It'll be hilarious at first :)
Thanks again for the reassurance!
 

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thank you Nelly! Yes he's destined to attend English classes in the immediate future and I have decided to only speak english to him in the house. It'll be hilarious at first :)
Thanks again for the reassurance!
That is good to hear :) good luck!! Keep us posted!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Geeee it looks like the hardest step will be' convincing my mother to give me her Australian birth certificate so I can apply for citizenship, she doesn't want me to leave! Is there I a way I can ask for it without her consent?
 

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Geeee it looks like the hardest step will be' convincing my mother to give me her Australian birth certificate so I can apply for citizenship, she doesn't want me to leave! Is there I a way I can ask for it without her consent?
Aww! I know how that goes... I'm pretty sure my dad was in denial about my leaving for Australia for at least 6 months. Then about two months before we went he came up to me and was like... oh wow, you're moving to Australia aren't you?

Yes dad :-( our poor families, huh! It's always easier to be the one leaving than the one left behind. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeah, and also she doesn't have fond memories of her life in Australia, she was from a family of immigrants that never truly joined the community, she felt she wasn't really Australian nor Italian and she fears the same will happen with my son growing up. But times have changed since the 60' haven't they?
 

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Oh yes! She is not alone, it happens to many immigrants' kids and can be very painful. You knowing that though will prevent you letting the same thing happen again.

I've hardly ever spoken to immigrants who did not at some point feel isolated or "misplaced" even if they tried to integrate very hard, but that can sometimes be part of the package deal and if you really want it to, it always passes. I've been in Australia for a year now and am only now starting to feel like I have friends and a place in society here. Takes time :)

Maybe seeing you do well here will also help her heal some old wounds :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yeah, i guess also being taken to Italy when she was in the middle of her teenage years, where in general you don't know who you are, didn't help in the matter. I think she wouldn't have been so wonded if my grandparents had decided to stay, part of the family has powered through and all thr three generations are now fully integrated. I expect some hard times, but that this is a chance I want to take, you have to work for the good things to come, I hope we get rewarded sooner or later. Yay for you for s tarting feeling at home!
 
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