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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I've been reading about different partnership visas and I've been shocked to find out how expensive it is and how long it would take.

My girlfriend of two years is Australian. We met in Sydney 2 years ago when I was there on a WHV. When my visa expired, we came to NZ. After 12 months in NZ my WHV expired, but we got me a de facto visa. The process was easy, free and processed in a month. Now we've been planning to come back to Australia, but the prices and processing times are just so staggering. $7000 and at least 12 months of waiting, what the heck?

I would like to hear experiences from other people. How common are those horror stories, e.g. paying 7k, waiting 12months and get rejected?

Or what about this scenario: we go back to Australia first, then apply for the visa. Would I be able to work on my bridging visa or would I just need to sit and wait for a year?

Would it fasten the process if we get married etc?

Thanks for your help!
 

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Hi AntonH,

Based on the information that you had provided it seems that you have been with your partner for more than 12 months and I'm assuming that you have been living together as well. The partner visa is an extensive process where constant information will need to be provided to prove that your relationship with your partner is genuine and continuing. The fact that you both have met in Sydney two years ago and have moved to NZ together already tells me how genuine your relationship is. You have evidence and ties to prove your relationship more than couples who have been together for less than 12 months.

You have a very strong case and I'm positive that your application will be approved if done properly. The partner visa application process is extensive and somewhat sensitive as all information provided to the department of immigration will need to be consistent. You will need to provide enough evidence to satisfy the four criteria of the Partner Visa (Commitment, Cohabitation, Social and Financial).

The bridging visa will allow you to:
- work in Australia
- study in Australia (no government support)
- enrol in Medicare, Australia’s healthcare scheme.

Hope this helps!

Crux Migration
 

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Simply applying for a partner visa will allow you to enrol for Medicare when in Australia on any valid visa.

It is not when a Bridging Visa is activated.

But some Medicare staff do not know this so you need to speak higher up until someone understands the rules or can read English.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi AntonH,

Based on the information that you had provided it seems that you have been with your partner for more than 12 months and I'm assuming that you have been living together as well. The partner visa is an extensive process where constant information will need to be provided to prove that your relationship with your partner is genuine and continuing. The fact that you both have met in Sydney two years ago and have moved to NZ together already tells me how genuine your relationship is. You have evidence and ties to prove your relationship more than couples who have been together for less than 12 months.

You have a very strong case and I'm positive that your application will be approved if done properly. The partner visa application process is extensive and somewhat sensitive as all information provided to the department of immigration will need to be consistent. You will need to provide enough evidence to satisfy the four criteria of the Partner Visa (Commitment, Cohabitation, Social and Financial).

The bridging visa will allow you to:
- work in Australia
- study in Australia (no government support)
- enrol in Medicare, Australia's healthcare scheme.

Hope this helps!

Crux Migration
Hi Crux Migration,

Thank you so much for your help!

Yeah we have enough documents of our relationship for the last 2 years, and I also think my application will be granted directly. Im glad I have the first year already documented since we had to do that for the NZ de facto visa.

So would it go like this: fly to Australia -> get automatically a 3-month visitor visa -> apply for partner visa -> get bridging visa in few days after lodging partner visa application.

Once again, thank you so much for your help! I will definitely contact Crux if I need help in any immigration issues :)
 

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Keep in mind that the Bridging Visa only kicks in when your current period of stay on the visitor visa expires (usually three months after entry).
 

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Also the Bridging Visa will have no travel rights, but you can apply for 1 that does have travel rights as and when required.

Most offshore applications are faster to be processed than onshore (plan on 18-24 months onshore).

Keep in mind your visa has a strong chance of being refused on character and medical grounds if they apply to you.

Also not mentioned is changes in the wind that may prevent you from onshore applications.

Crux Migration (I don't know who they are) gave you hope but very basic information.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Also the Bridging Visa will have no travel rights, but you can apply for 1 that does have travel rights as and when required.

Most offshore applications are faster to be processed than onshore (plan on 18-24 months onshore).

Keep in mind your visa has a strong chance of being refused on character and medical grounds if they apply to you.

Also not mentioned is changes in the wind that may prevent you from onshore applications.

Crux Migration (I don't know who they are) gave you hope but very basic information.
Thanks for your advices ampk!

I don't mind about the travel rights as long as I could get the visa in 12 months, but wow, 18-24 months? Do they always take 18-24 months or is that just a ceiling limit?

What if I apply from NZ? Can I enter Australia before I get the partner visa? Would I still be on visitor visa or would it become bridging visa at that point?

I don't think my application could be refused because of character(no criminal record, no debts, degree in chemical engineering etc) or medical issues(no long term illnesses, not travelled in risky countries).

Excuse me, what do you mean by "changes in the wind"? Like changes in migration laws etc?
 

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You only get a bridging visa if you apply onshore. If you apply offshore you can enter on a visitor visa, but you would not be eligible for a bridging visa and you would not be able to work, etc. You would have to comply with the visitor visa conditions - i.e if your period of stay is 3 months you would have to go offshore before that 3 months expires. You would also have to go offshore for the grant (DIBP would normally contact you when they are ready to make a decision and ask you to go offshore. On the plus side offshore applications tend to be processed a bit faster.
 

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Like changes in migration laws etc?

Yes all good Registered Migration Agents are aware of proposed changes to 2018. Full details are not known but we have been informed of a few things such as sponsorship changes.

I would be researching Crux Migration before using them.
 

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Like changes in migration laws etc?

Yes all good Registered Migration Agents are aware of proposed changes to 2018. Full details are not known but we have been informed of a few things such as sponsorship changes.

I would be researching Crux Migration before using them.
They have a website: https://cruxmigration.com.au/
They are based in Sydney and the principals name is Kris Ahn
There appears to be a MARNA number, but it isn't very prominent.
I am surprised they didn't introduce their services more formally if they want to solicit for business and/or offer advice.
 

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Hi Crux Migration,

Thank you so much for your help!

Yeah we have enough documents of our relationship for the last 2 years, and I also think my application will be granted directly. Im glad I have the first year already documented since we had to do that for the NZ de facto visa.

So would it go like this: fly to Australia -> get automatically a 3-month visitor visa -> apply for partner visa -> get bridging visa in few days after lodging partner visa application.

Once again, thank you so much for your help! I will definitely contact Crux if I need help in any immigration issues :)
No problem at all AntonH!

Assuming that the visitor visa does have a No Further Stay Condition, the partner visa can be lodged onshore. A bridging visa should be granted automatically (straight away) after the application is lodged. Also, since the bridging visa doesn't kick in until the visitor visa expires, the condition of the visitor visa must be followed until it is expired.
 

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Like changes in migration laws etc?

Yes, all good Registered Migration Agents are aware of proposed changes to 2018. Full details are not known but we have been informed of a few things such as sponsorship changes.

I would be researching Crux Migration before using them.
Thank you for pointing this out AMPK. All Migration Agents are informed of these proposed changes and as you mentioned, full details are not known. Until 2018 comes, there is no certainty that these changes will occur or what exactly will occur.

The information that we had provided to AntonH is also available on the Department of Immigration website. The department has updated their website so all information regarding the partner visa is much easier to access and understand.

Please feel free to read our reviews on google and look up our principle lawyer, Kris Ahn (MARN 1171577), who is an Accredited Specialist Immigration Law.
 

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Hi TGNY,

Thank you for looking us up and for your concern.

Yes, we do have a website. We also have Facebook and Instagram. Please free to also read our reviews on google as well.

Our Principal lawyer, Kris Ahn MARN 1171577, is an Accredited Specialist in Immigration Law. To date, there are less than 90 accredited specialists in immigration law, amongst over 7000 migration professionals.

We're not here to solicit for business but merely, to offer our insights and information regarding Australia migration law.

We apologize for any misunderstanding caused.
 

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They have a website: https://cruxmigration.com.au/
They are based in Sydney and the principals name is Kris Ahn
There appears to be a MARNA number, but it isn't very prominent.
I am surprised they didn't introduce their services more formally if they want to solicit for business and/or offer advice.
TGNY seems we are invisible! most good RMA's correct errors posters make on this forum.

Guess just fishing!
 
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