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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All,

First post here.

I am an Australian citizen, helping a Japanese friend look into options for getting Permanent Residence in Australia. She has lived here in Australia for around 5 years on various visas including working holiday, visitor and student visas (mostly just studying English I think).

She is currently 29 years old and would like to settle in Australia permanently. Have spent many hours looking at government immigration websites and other sites with give information about immigration, including this one. Still a bit confused though about how the various visas work, so posting here.

The option which is most appealing to her at the moment is to study Cookery for 2 years at TAFE, then apply for one of the various visas that can lead to PR.

Our main question at the moment is, which visa is she best to apply for after studying Cookery? Or at least what the pros and cons of each of them?

Looking at the employer sponsored visas, it seems she would need to have 3 years experience post-graduation and be offered a job paying over approximately $53000 per annum (can't remember exact figure right now) to qualify for those. So one option would be to work 1.5 years in Australia as a chef after graduating on a graduate visa, then go back to Japan and work there for 1.5 years to get 3 years experience. Or get a Temporary Skills Shortage (TSS) visa after the graduate visa, and get 3.5 years experience in Australia (1.5 years on a graduate visa, 2 years on a TSS visa). Seems though that it might be difficult to find a chef job paying $53K with just 3 years experience?

Then, there are the 189 and 190 visas. These seem a bit more viable, possibly. Have looked into how to apply for these, but have not found much information on what her chances are of these actually being granted. It seems they use a point system, so those with the most points get selected first, and as I said above she will be only starting to get experience as a chef after graduating. She has an IELTS score of minimum of 6.0 in all bands too. She will probably be 32 or 33 when she finishes her cookery course, depending if she starts early or mid next year.

She is currently in Brisbane, but thinks her best option might be to study and work in Adelaide, as this will give her an extra 5 points for being in a regional area, giving her 60-65 points.

If there are any other visa options we've missed, would appreciate being informed of them.

Would also like to hear from others who are currently going down the Cookery to PR path.

I know PR is never guaranteed, but what are her rough chances of getting PR this way?

Happy give more details.

Thanks for any advice.
 

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Hi :)

I'd suggest contacting a registered migration agent in regards to this.

You have specific questions which need answering, they can help you with that as well as putting together some plan in order for your friend to gain PR.
 

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Last time I checked, Cook (ANZSCO 3514110) was not on the MLTSSL, which rules out a sc.189 visa.

There may be some options under state nominated visas (sc. 489 and 190), but you'd have to check all the state migration websites for skills lists and additional requirements.

Then there are the various employer sponsored visas and possibly sc. 485 (Temporary Graduate).

It is however not recommended to try and link your choice of study to a potential migration outcome. Who knows what the rules will be in 2 or 3 years time?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No doubt a good idea.

Hi


I'd suggest contacting a registered migration agent in regards to this.

You have specific questions which need answering, they can help you with that as well as putting together some plan in order for your friend to gain PR.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the reply, CCMS.

Chef seems to be on there now, which is what she'll be after finishing the course she wants to do:

www.legislation.gov.au/Details/F2017L00850

Cook is what she'd be before graduating. Cook is basically someone who prepares food without that qualification.

Actually, the 190 visa was one that was a bit confusing.

As far as I can see, she would submit an EOI, either for specific states or any state, then a state/territory government agency will see that and nominate her. It says here:

https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa-1/190-

"We recommend that you contact the state or territory government agency from whom you are seeking a nomination to discuss their nomination process and requirements.

Submit an expression of interest (EOI) via SkillSelect with details of your nominated occupation, skills and qualifications. SkillSelect will estimate a points score; if you score high enough, Australian state and territory government agencies will be able to view your EOI and decide if they want to nominate you."

So the decision is entirely made by a government agency, no employers involved?

Last time I checked, Cook (ANZSCO 3514110) was not on the MLTSSL, which rules out a sc.189 visa.

There may be some options under state nominated visas (sc. 489 and 190), but you'd have to check all the state migration websites for skills lists and additional requirements.

Then there are the various employer sponsored visas and possibly sc. 485 (Temporary Graduate).

It is however not recommended to try and link your choice of study to a potential migration outcome. Who knows what the rules will be in 2 or 3 years time?
 

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Thanks for the reply, CCMS.

Chef seems to be on there now, which is what she'll be after finishing the course she wants to do:

www.legislation.gov.au/Details/F2017L00850

Cook is what she'd be before graduating. Cook is basically someone who prepares food without that qualification.

Actually, the 190 visa was one that was a bit confusing.

As far as I can see, she would submit an EOI, either for specific states or any state, then a state/territory government agency will see that and nominate her. It says here:

https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa-1/190-

"We recommend that you contact the state or territory government agency from whom you are seeking a nomination to discuss their nomination process and requirements.

Submit an expression of interest (EOI) via SkillSelect with details of your nominated occupation, skills and qualifications. SkillSelect will estimate a points score; if you score high enough, Australian state and territory government agencies will be able to view your EOI and decide if they want to nominate you."

So the decision is entirely made by a government agency, no employers involved?
Chef and Cook are 2 quite different occupations.You should have a good look at the skills assessment requirements.

When applying for state nomination, you nominate only one state, otherwise no one will touch it. The relevant state office may then issue an invitation. Note that each state has its own additional requirements re. study, work experience, residence, assets etc.

Of course none of the current vis information may be relevant by the time she finishes her degree...

Cook
Description: Prepares, seasons and cooks food in a dining or catering establishment.

Skill Level 3 : Occupations at Skill Level 3 have a level of skill commensurate with one of the following:

- NZ Register Level 4 qualification
- AQF Certificate IV or
- AQF Certificate III including at least two years of on-the-job training.

Chef
Description: Plan and organise the preparation and cooking of food in dining and catering establishments. Cooks, Fast Food Cooks and Kitchenhands are excluded from this unit group. Cooks are included in Unit Group 3514 Cooks. Fast Food Cooks and Kitchenhands are included in Minor Group 851 Food Preparation Assistants.

Skill Level: Most occupations in this unit group have a level of skill commensurate with the qualifications and experience outlined below.

- In Australia:

AQF Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma (ANZSCO Skill Level 2)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My housemate, who has been a chef for 11 years, seems to think she will be a chef after finishing the two year course (it's a diploma course, I think.) Worth double checking, of course.

That things may change with visa laws etc. while she is studying is a concern, but at least she will have a qualification even if she has to return to Japan. And she is quite interested in cooking as an occupation.

Thanks for info about applying to one state only.

Another concern: I imagine there would be a fair amount of competition for nomination, and the government agency might look over her expression of interest in favour of other chefs who have more experience.

Though she will have at least 1 year experience before submitting her EOI (Expression of Interest), during which time she will be having the necessary skills assessment.

Chef and Cook are 2 quite different occupations.You should have a good look at the skills assessment requirements.

When applying for state nomination, you nominate only one state, otherwise no one will touch it. The relevant state office may then issue an invitation. Note that each state has its own additional requirements re. study, work experience, residence, assets etc.

Of course none of the current vis information may be relevant by the time she finishes her degree...

Cook
Description: Prepares, seasons and cooks food in a dining or catering establishment.

Skill Level 3 : Occupations at Skill Level 3 have a level of skill commensurate with one of the following:

- NZ Register Level 4 qualification
- AQF Certificate IV or
- AQF Certificate III including at least two years of on-the-job training.

Chef
Description: Plan and organise the preparation and cooking of food in dining and catering establishments. Cooks, Fast Food Cooks and Kitchenhands are excluded from this unit group. Cooks are included in Unit Group 3514 Cooks. Fast Food Cooks and Kitchenhands are included in Minor Group 851 Food Preparation Assistants.

Skill Level: Most occupations in this unit group have a level of skill commensurate with the qualifications and experience outlined below.

- In Australia:

AQF Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma (ANZSCO Skill Level 2)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Just another quick question. So if she put in two seperate EOIs one to South Australia and one to Queensland, neither of them are likely to be successful?

From looking at the criteria for South Australia, they are particularly interested in international graduates who have studied in SA, and have a certain amount of work experience in SA.

Whereas Queensland seems to have less strict criteria.

So if she studies in SA, it would be nice if she apply to both states, as she would probably like to eventually come back to Brisbane.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Actually, just looked again, and it seems she should be either working in Queensland or overseas to put in an EOI here.
 

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Just another quick question. So if she put in two seperate EOIs one to South Australia and one to Queensland, neither of them are likely to be successful?

From looking at the criteria for South Australia, they are particularly interested in international graduates who have studied in SA, and have a certain amount of work experience in SA.

Whereas Queensland seems to have less strict criteria.

So if she studies in SA, it would be nice if she apply to both states, as she would probably like to eventually come back to Brisbane.
I know from the people that assess the state nominations in QLD that if you nominate more than one state, they will not consider you, as you need to express a strong commitment to wanting to live and work in THEIR state.

I am not sure if they can check if you have lodged multiple EOI's with different states, but I imagine they could.

I don't want to go into the complexities of what is a Cook and what is a Chef, but you can read up about the various skills assessments on the TRA website.If you have a look at the ANZSCO descriptions it is obvious that they are different occupations with different skill levels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the advice, CCMS.

Fairly sure she will be a qualified chef after completing the diploma course, but definitely worth checking again.

I know from the people that assess the state nominations in QLD that if you nominate more than one state, they will not consider you, as you need to express a strong commitment to wanting to live and work in THEIR state.

I am not sure if they can check if you have lodged multiple EOI's with different states, but I imagine they could.

I don't want to go into the complexities of what is a Cook and what is a Chef, but you can read up about the various skills assessments on the TRA website.If you have a look at the ANZSCO descriptions it is obvious that they are different occupations with different skill levels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So, if she wants to eventually settle in Queensland, looks like it will be better for her to study in a regional area of Queensland (to get the 5 points for regional study) then put in an EOI here, after graduating and getting a skills assessment.

Another quick question, does the amount of points an applicant have influence their chance of being nominated?

Or is someone with say 60 points just as likely to get nominated as someone with 70 points?
 

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The higher the points, the better the chance of receiving an invitation. If there are a lot of applicants, the ones with lower scores may never receive an invitation. That's the whole idea of the point system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
OK, thanks a lot, CCMS.

The higher the points, the better the chance of receiving an invitation. If there are a lot of applicants, the ones with lower scores may never receive an invitation. That's the whole idea of the point system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Have looked into options a bit more.

Looking at the new Temporary Skill Shortage visa, Chef qualifies for the 4 year version, which as I understand it gives the option to apply for PR after 3 years.

However, 2 years experience post-graduation is required to get a TSS visa. She would most likely be able to get a 1.5 year graduate visa after finishing her course, but that means she'd still be half a year short.

What options would she have to stay in Australia a bit longer to get the extra experience?

Or perhaps just go back to Japan for awhile and get the extra work experience?
 

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The only way to do this properly is to systematically go through each potential visa class and check all the requirements in great detail.

In addition, with the 2 state nominated visas, you need to go through all the additional requirements for each state/territory.

This will probably take a full day, but anything else will be just guesswork.

Keep in mind that the states also have additional (unofficial) guidelines to weed out applicants who are not genuine about wanting to live and work in their state, but just use the nomination to gain PR.

Considering the fact that overall migration regulations are regularly overhauled on short notice and that the states also regularly revise their skills lists and other requirement, there may not be much point in carrying out this exercise so long in advance.
 
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