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Hi,

While pondering the processing of my PMV 300 application my fiancé and I were discussing where someone’s age may be a deterrent to the granting of a visa.

So, is there an age cut off point for this visa, or does age come into the decision making process?
 

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Hi,

While pondering the processing of my PMV 300 application my fiancé and I were discussing where someone's age may be a deterrent to the granting of a visa.

So, is there an age cut off point for this visa, or does age come into the decision making process?
There is no age limit, but there is a medical involved so I guess there is a higher risk of failing that the older you get.
 

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Age may come into it, where there is a big age difference or , as mentioned by the previous poster, the applicant has serious health issues.
 

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What do you feel is considered to be a big age difference as far as Immigration Dept. is concerned?
15-20 plus years. It should not be an issue, but it is officially considered a risk factor and may trigger additional scrutiny.
 

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Hi FreddoBee,

Your post is definitely of interest to me as there is a 30 year age difference in my case!

I certainly hope in this time of rejection of racism, sexism and emancipation of the LGTBI community in Australia, ageism is also rejected.

There is no longer an expectation of a fixed retirement age so there should be no upper limit on love!!

I am confident I can convince the department that despite this our love is genuine and abiding but understand there will be questions about this in the review process.

I wish us both luck in our applications and hope the scrutiny is simply related to my fiancee's fitness to become an Australian and my wife.

It should have nothing to do with my age but whether I am a fit person to become her husband.
 

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Thanks, Nick, I'll have to take my chances with a 24-year age gap I guess.
There is nothing wrong with any age gap per se, but they do consider large age gaps a risk factor, so it is usually best to address this in your personal statements.

I agree that age should not matter, but the reality is that it does (in terms of what the Department looks at).
 

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There is nothing wrong with any age gap per se, but they do consider large age gaps a risk factor, so it is usually best to address this in your personal statements.

I agree that age should not matter, but the reality is that it does (in terms of what the Department looks at).
Thanks Nick.

I didn't do that although of course we are both well aware of it without it being anything significant - the language gap is far more an issue but that can and is bridged with patience. She must improve her English and I can learn Thai although the written form is SO difficult!

I guess I hoped they may not notice or care but if I mentioned it they would definitely have to take it into account :)
 

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Thanks Nick.

I didn't do that although of course we are both well aware of it without it being anything significant - the language gap is far more an issue but that can and is bridged with patience. She must improve her English and I can learn Thai although the written form is SO difficult!

I guess I hoped they may not notice or care but if I mentioned it they would definitely have to take it into account :)
Learning each other language(s) is strong evidence of "commitment". I have only ever seen the age issue issue raised in interviews. I think that what typically happens is that a certain age gap may raise a flag and this will cause the overall evidence to be scrutinised more closely.

There are any number of MRT/AAT cases where age gap issues have been dismissed as irrelevant.
 

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81/25 was a walk in the tribunal, having been refused at the primary decision stage. They had been married for 8 years and had 2 Australian citizen children.

May I suggest that you do some more homework, or consult a registered migration agent about 'genuine relationship'?
 

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Thanks Westly

I understand your viewpoint. I know people who have been married for 20 years who would fail this arbitrary definition.

In my mind a genuine relationship involves genuine commitment, love, lust and the feeling we cannot live without each other

My fiancée and have that in spades. The annals of history are full of stories of loveless marriages of convenience. Our relationship is not one and only time can be the proof. Even having children is not real proof of anything other than physical ability to procreate.

Once a bureaucrat gets asked to determine whether a relationship is genuine they are forced to resort to documentation as proof.

I will be on the way to Thailand in two weeks for the fourth visit to my fiancée since I met her here in March and she left Australia in April. I think that alone should show genuine commitment. I am talking to her right now on Facebook as I do almost every hour of every day.
 

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Do you mean financial entanglement is proof of a genuine relationship?

If that is so then people should buy a house together or start a business to prove they love each other?

Having been married twice and gone through the financial dis-entanglement twice I'm not sure this is a valid measuring stick for true commitment.
 

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Do you mean financial entanglement is proof of a genuine relationship?

If that is so then people should buy a house together or start a business to prove they love each other?

Having been married twice and gone through the financial dis-entanglement twice I'm not sure this is a valid measuring stick for true commitment.
I do not make the rules or policies. I can only tell you what they are.
Love is not defined in the regulations.
In my previous post, the ages should have been 81/35 not 81/25.
 

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Thanks Westly.

Please don't take my comments as personal criticism.
I also understand that love is much harder to measure than financial commitments.

But if a couple are applying for a visa such as the 300 PMV for the which the sole criteria are the couple are engaged and want to marry and the applicant is offshore then financial matters would not normally be entangled as the relationship is by definition in its early stages.

Once the applicant's credentials have been confirmed then the CO needs to be convinced the commitment is genuine.
Then provided they are satisfied the couple intend to abide by the rules there should be no impediment to granting a visa.

Is this fair summary of the requirements?
 

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I'm not sure, it's certainly a question on the application "Give details of the financial aspects of the relationship".

I would guess even at the early stages there would be some aspects of financial support either way or mutual agreement on who is paying for visits/wedding etc. These financial entanglements could vary between fully supported to two independents making a commitment to share costs of hotels/flights/arrangements/plans etc.

I suspect each case is individual and it's the case officers job to determine if the financial entanglements are representative of the evidence and circumstances articulated in the application.
 

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Thanks Mattb.

Yes of course I have answered these type of questions but because of the disparity in our wealth I will be responsible for all the expenses and have clearly stated so in my submissions.

We are both entirely happy with this arrangement as we are partners in love not business!

She does own a partially completed house in Thailand and I have also mentioned that but as an IT guy in Australia my income is more than enough for two!
 
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