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Hi guys, just wondering if anyone can help me confirm my points calculations are correct.

I have been getting really annoyed about having to get 'superior English' on these exams when I am a native English speaker, just to get the 20 points. I have now understood I might not need to get those 20 as I can get these points elsewhere. If anyone can help check I am not going crazy I would be very grateful.

Total required points = 60

Age 25-32: 30
English proficient: 10
Skilled employment outside aus for 3 years: 5
Skilled employment in aus for 1 year: 5
A Bachelors degree: 15

Total = 65

My query is about the part which says:

'A Bachelor degree from an Australian educational institution or a Bachelor qualification, from another educational institution that is of a recognised standard.'

I have a degree from a UK university which has been verified by an Australian accreditation board. It was done at BSc level. Does this count for the 15 points? or is it saying 'this degree must have been done in Australia'? The language is very confusing!

Lastly, I graduated uni in 2015 so I have done 3 years work, 10 months of that time I spent in Australia, this means I have done 2 years 2 months in UK and 10 months in Aus, so therefore I would technically get 0 points for both of the skilled employment categories. Is it a much safer bet to put down my work in the UK as 3 years so not to complicate it and get more points than I actually require.
 

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The correct visa class is sc.189, not 187.

If your overseas BD is recognised in Australia and you have a positive skills assessment, you can claim 15 points.

A lot of native English speakers are “annoyed” about having to do English tests for extra points and are surprised at how hard it is to actually pass the test, especially the one for “Superior English” . Many are incorrectly assuming that their English is automatically “Superior”.

Fact is that native speakers already have a significant advantage because they are assumed to have competent English solely because of the passport they are holding. Everyone else needs to prove it.

I think the idea with the points test was to make a level playing field, where everybody has to do the test to claim any points. Seems fair enough to me. As a native speaker you should have a significant advantage over those who are not native speakers anyway, when it comes to doing the test.

If you can’t score 4x8 in the IELTS test, then you do not have “Superior English” skills, native speaker or not.
 
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