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Hi everyone,
I would like to know if Immigration really do a surprise visit to couple's place? Or anyone have experienced it?
Thanks heaps!
 

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Hi everyone,
I would like to know if Immigration really do a surprise visit to couple's place? Or anyone have experienced it?
Thanks heaps!
I haven't experienced it, but from what I have read, then yes there is every chance of a surprise visit.

Kttykat
 

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Yes, they can, and they'll look for evidence that the relationship is genuine - including questions about and requests to see who sleeps where, and with whom. The good news is that if DIAC draws the wrong conclusions base on this sort of thing, it can be contested at the Migration Review Tribunal, etc.
 

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Does this happen more onshore, offshore, or both equally? I'd love a surprise visit from DIAC, that would be jackpot for us.
 

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I'm curious if they do this only for people applying onshore, or for people like us after we get our PMV and before we apply for the permanent partner visa. :D I think it would actually be fun to have DIAC visit (how lame am I?) and to show them who sleeps where, what our setup is, etc. :D Easy way to prove our legitimacy! Just knock first, DIAC, because you're keeping us separated for months... I can't promise you won't go blind if you just walk in once I'm together with him again... ;) LOL!
 

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No idea what/who this blog is based on but it mentions 200 onshore partner visa home visits in 2011 - I started googling this fascinating possibility.

Partner Visas ? What?s new October 2011? | Australian Immigration Blog - Grant Williams
He's Grant Williams, a migration agent who gives out little bits of free advice on his blog. Further in the comments on this post, there's this interesting exchange about home visits:

  • sandy | February 13, 2012 at 11:46 am

    Hi my sister and partner have just applied for a spouse visa and they were told they might have a a home visit from immigration so they should try and be at home most times. I'd like to know if there is a problem if there is if one of them is not home when they come to visit? Also who conducts these visits? Will they be contacted by the CO to let them know that their case has been assigned to someone?…I'm sorry so many questions but DIMIA can be a little confusing sometimes.
    Thanks
    • Immigration Pty Ltd | February 13, 2012 at 9:45 pm |

      Hi Sandy
      No one can be expected to stay home 24/7 that's just crazy. They should go about their normal patterns of life. Who told them to "be at home most times"?
      Grant Williams
  • sandy | February 14, 2012 at 7:29 am |

    Their migration agent said that they should try and be home because you never know when they'll pop in. But to me this sounds ludicrous. They have lives, social lives. Crazy!! I told them not to worry to just continue to live as they have and if someone comes and their not home then they'll just have to try again.
    Thanks
    • Immigration Pty Ltd | February 14, 2012 at 7:32 am |

      Agreed. DIAC do make random home visits. I've never had a client fall into that category in 15 years but I guess there is always a first time. The Partner visa is a paper application and if they have lodged sufficient evidence of their genuine relationship it is highly unlikely that they will be subject to a random home visit. Common sense must rule the day here. Grant Williams
 

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Interesting... so it's very possible, but not necessarily common?

I honestly hope if they doubt us for any reason they'll pay us a visit. We live with his parents (and their 4 year old granddaughter) and not only are they witnesses who'd make a good impression but also there is only two adult bedrooms, each with a queensize bed, and one of our walls is covered in pics of us with the Dutch families, our kitties, a map pinpointing places we want to travel together with notes, and our relationship certificate framed above the bed - and obviously all our stuff mixed into the cupboard. And all that other jazz.

I'd say our home is some of our best evidence! I wonder how they decide who to visit...
 
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whilst reading Nelly,s post and clicking on her link i also found this about partner visa,s very interesting,
Partner Visa Processing 2013 Expect Delays ? Mediocrity in action? | Australian Immigration Blog - Grant Williams
Great post by Mr. Williams. Goes right along with what our lovely Mark Northam said. I understand how government agencies work firsthand, and there may have been no way for them to predict QUITE how many applications they'd be looking at when the great landslide of them happened. I'd be willing to be the COs they do have are working their butts off with all these extra applications and getting nothing but harassment for how long it's taking in response. But rather than extending processing times, you'd think they'd hire more staff. I also know how government budget processes work (at least here in the US), and it can be hard to just pull out significant amounts of money you didn't know you need, and I get that. But the fact is... they need it. They need more case officers, and they need to do whatever they need to to make that happen. Just my opinion, of course.
 

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CC your opinion always makes sense lol. I agree that the gov need more staff, its a shame they cannot recruit more. The time of waiting is tremendous, seems my agent was right telling me the min waiting time was 14 months lol.

louise
 
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I'm going to be right there with you shortly, Louise. I anticipate we'll have to wait quite a while. But at least we can apply now!! There is light at the end of the tunnel, even when it's a long tunnel. :) *hugs*
 

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But rather than extending processing times, you'd think they'd hire more staff. I also know how government budget processes work (at least here in the US), and it can be hard to just pull out significant amounts of money you didn't know you need, and I get that. But the fact is... they need it. They need more case officers, and they need to do whatever they need to to make that happen. Just my opinion, of course.
But the thing is they do have this money - there is a projected extra 500 million coming from the huge visa cost increases over the next four years. The problem is that it's not going back into the system it's coming from. No, potential migrants are paying for the government to fulfil its election promises for Australians, such as paid maternity leave.

From the huge revenue they're raising from the increased costs we as applicants have to incur, they have plenty of money to hire more case officers - they're simply not using that money to do so.
 

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But the thing is they do have this money - there is a projected extra 500 million coming from the huge visa cost increases over the next four years. The problem is that it's not going back into the system it's coming from. No, potential migrants are paying for the government to fulfil its election promises for Australians, such as paid maternity leave.

From the huge revenue they're raising from the increased costs we as applicants have to incur, they have plenty of money to hire more case officers - they're simply not using that money to do so.
Yes, it (the raise in price) wasn't even almost intended for the immigration process itself. In my opinion they said times are getting a bit tougher so it's only fair that immigrants who want the right to work contribute extra to Australia as a whole.

Nothing against it, I realize I am asking to be let into a country that owes me nothing... but these partner visa applications aren't just extra fees for ambitious workers... they also directly affect the happiness of an Australian citizen (the sponsor) for one. They should still be trying to improve the partner processing system, and they're not, and they make it impossible to identify why.

I'm just wondering what I should be imagining - too few case officers desperately trying to keep up with way too many cases each, or plenty of case officers trapped in an increasingly complicated maze of rules to go by before they can approve.
 
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