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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
CONTRIBUTORY PARENT VISA

Like many, I fail the Balance of Family Test and find myself in a pickle. My siblings are grown up, settled and have lives of their own. No chance of moving here.

Having worked hard to gain Residency, I now operate a Company, pay a good chunk in tax and have private health care. My family, are just as successful as me, with skilled occupations, good morals and fluent English speakers.

My parents would love to join me out here and contribute to Australia. At under 55 and healthy they still have a good couple of decades of work under their belt and a solid pension built up from the UK.

But they can't. Because of the BOF Test.

I see that a new visa is coming this year. Wonderful for those who need grand parents to look after kids as this seems to be the main emphasis, but what about us who don't have or plan on having kids? The Visa gives some hope, but its still not ideal. No permanent gateway or work rights. I am however, completely inspired that a petition brought this issue to light. And this is the reason for my post.

For all of those people who meet all requirements yet fall short because of BOF I wanted to get your support and start a petition of our own, not to create a new visa but to amend the terms.

I have written to Peter Dutton a few times and will continue to. I have suggested that all applicants have a pension or financial support from the Child in Aus. That they get Health Care and give a guarantee that they will not suck off the state.

I am at a dead end and have exausted all options.

Thoughts :)
 

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My thoughts? Unlikely to succeed unfortunately, would open the floodgates for older 'non-contributing' relatives. The social security system is already in crisis with the rapidly aging population. I don't agree but this is the way the Government will frame the issue. You'd be better off trying for contributory parent, it's an expensive, but more realistic option if you genuinely want your parents to join you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I agree- I actually was meaning a Contributory Visa- I will amend this in the title. My parents are wiling to pay but as far as I am aware BOF still applies. Can you clairfy?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You got me confused for a second there. You need to pass balance of family for this visa you have suggested, My family genuinely DO want to come here and are willing to pay to get in. They just aren't millionaires to do Investor.They also have skills on the list and a pension.

Sorry if my original post was not clear
 

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CONTRIBUTORY PARENT VISA

My parents would love to join me out here and contribute to Australia. At under 55 and healthy they still have a good couple of decades of work under their belt and a solid pension built up from the UK.
I was curious about this and looked up something on the Fact sheet - Contributory Parent https://www.border.gov.au/about/corporate/information/fact-sheets/39contributory-parent

Age requirements
The primary applicant must satisfy the aged requirement for both Contributory Aged Parent (Residence) visa (subclass 864) or Contributory Aged Parent (Temporary) visa (subclass 884) applications.
An 'aged' parent is one who is old enough to be granted the Australian aged pension. (From 1 July 2017, the qualifying age will increase to 65 years and six months. The qualify age will increase by six months every two years, to 67 years by 1 July 2023.)
 

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The BOF test was designed as an objective measure of a parent's ties to Australia and I can’t see it being abolished any time soon. The reasoning could be that parents might be less inclined to become properly settled in Australia, if a majority of their children continue to live outside Australia.

You might be better off directing your energy towards getting more of your siblings into Australia, so your parents can meet the current regulations, rather than trying to change them.

Like age limits, it seems an arbitrary measure, but obviously if you want a manageable system, you need to draw the line somewhere.
 

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I was curious about this and looked up something on the Fact sheet - Contributory Parent https://www.border.gov.au/about/corporate/information/fact-sheets/39contributory-parent

Age requirements
The primary applicant must satisfy the aged requirement for both Contributory Aged Parent (Residence) visa (subclass 864) or Contributory Aged Parent (Temporary) visa (subclass 884) applications.
An 'aged' parent is one who is old enough to be granted the Australian aged pension. (From 1 July 2017, the qualifying age will increase to 65 years and six months. The qualify age will increase by six months every two years, to 67 years by 1 July 2023.)
The Contributory Parent Visa has no age limit. The Contributory Aged Parent visa does have an age limit.One major difference is that the Contributory Aged Parent visa is an onshore visa and therefore the applicant may be entitled to a bridging visa..
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was curious about this and looked up something on the Fact sheet - Contributory Parent https://www.border.gov.au/about/corporate/information/fact-sheets/39contributory-parent

Age requirements
The primary applicant must satisfy the aged requirement for both Contributory Aged Parent (Residence) visa (subclass 864) or Contributory Aged Parent (Temporary) visa (subclass 884) applications.
An 'aged' parent is one who is old enough to be granted the Australian aged pension. (From 1 July 2017, the qualifying age will increase to 65 years and six months. The qualify age will increase by six months every two years, to 67 years by 1 July 2023.)
The Contributory Parent Visa has no age limit. The Contributory Aged Parent visa does have an age limit.One major difference is that the Contributory Aged Parent visa is an onshore visa and therefore the applicant may be entitled to a bridging visa..
Thank you its good to know there is no age limit. However still can't apply for either as BOF applies
 

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Thank you its good to know there is no age limit. However still can't apply for either as BOF applies
Therefore you should try to convince enough of your siblings to move to Australia. That's more realistic than trying to change a regulation that has been deliberately imposed.
 

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Sorry, Nprance I hope you don't mind my post.

I'm just curious if anyone knows why the processing time for the Parent Visa 103 is up to 30 years?

Do people actually wait that long?
 

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The Contributory Parent Visa has no age limit. The Contributory Aged Parent visa does have an age limit.One major difference is that the Contributory Aged Parent visa is an onshore visa and therefore the applicant may be entitled to a bridging visa..
I was wondering about that when I read it.
The page is a bit confusing when it starts of with:
Fact sheet - Contributory Parent

To apply for a contributory parent visa, etc..
It pays to read everything very thoroughly, or risk making mistakes, such as mine on that one.
 

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Sorry, Nprance I hope you don't mind my post.

I'm just curious if anyone knows why the processing time for the Parent Visa 103 is up to 30 years?

Do people actually wait that long?
My thinking is that is it may be due to Medicare.

Bridging visas are available, so they can stay in Australia while Immigration processes the visa, however, there appears to be no access to Medicare until the visa is granted, after about 30 years.

Result is; they can live in Australia, but must be supported by the sponsor, especially regarding health issues.

Not sure how accurate this is, but I read a 2016 report that says there were 1,500 non-contributory visa allocations in that year, with about 40,000 applicants waiting.
 

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My thinking is that is it may be due to Medicare.

Bridging visas are available, so they can stay in Australia while Immigration processes the visa, however, there appears to be no access to Medicare until the visa is granted, after about 30 years.

Result is; they can live in Australia, but must be supported by the sponsor, especially regarding health issues.

Not sure how accurate this is, but I read a 2016 report that says there were 1,500 non-contributory visa allocations in that year, with about 40,000 applicants waiting.
I didn't realise they would be entitled to a bridging visa, it's not so bad then in a way.

So technically a parent could come for a visit, apply onshore and spend 30 years living here as long as their child covers their expenses? That's not a bad deal really.

I was just shocked with the processing time :eek:

I guess I can't really complain about the 820/801 waiting times when comparing to that :rolleyes:
 

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I'm just curious if anyone knows why the processing time for the Parent Visa 103 is up to 30 years?

Do people actually wait that long?
The reason is that there are currently only very few places available each financial year (1500 for non-contributory parent visas) and thousands of applications which have been building up in a very long queue over the years.

If you had a cynical mind-set, you might suspect that the expectation is that most applicants will be dead before a decision on their application will be made.An additional complication is that many of those who are still alive may not be able to meet the health requirements by the time their application will be processed.

Onshore applicants can of course stay in Australia more or less indefinitely on a bridging visa, which has its own drawbacks, but at least they are with their family.
 

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The reason is that there are currently only very few places available each financial year (1500 for non-contributory parent visas) and thousands of applications which have been building up in a very long queue over the years.

If you had a cynical mind-set, you might suspect that the expectation is that most applicants will be dead before a decision on their application will be made.An additional complication is that many of those who are still alive may not be able to meet the health requirements by the time their application will be processed.

Onshore applicants can of course stay in Australia more or less indefinitely on a bridging visa, which has its own drawbacks, but at least they are with their family.
If my mum for example applied now, she may not get a decision until she's 83!

Wouldn't it make more sense to do a sort of EOI system whereby invites are sent out and once the quota has been reached for the year, they would stop invitations?

But then I suppose the downside of that is you wouldn't be able to stay on a bridging visa without an invitation and application.

I just can't believe it's 30 years! Longer than I've been alive haha
 

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If my mum for example applied now, she may not get a decision until she's 83!

Wouldn't it make more sense to do a sort of EOI system whereby invites are sent out and once the quota has been reached for the year, they would stop invitations?

But then I suppose the downside of that is you wouldn't be able to stay on a bridging visa without an invitation and application.

I just can't believe it's 30 years! Longer than I've been alive haha
It's not high priority in an economic sense. That's why there are so few places and they tried to abolish those visa classes altogether.

The contributory parent visa fees go some way towards paying the cost of people settling in Australia who, because of their age, are not likely to contribute very much economically to Australia in terms of paying tax etc.

Of course there are social benefits, etc., but I don't think the bean counters are too interested in that.
 
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