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Hi everyone

My question: When you lodge your application it says that all the documents you are lodging with is should be certified, what does this mean and how does ine do it, say for instance I have to certify my birth certificare, how is this done?

Thanks for this excellent forum!
 

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Hi Marianne,

It says on the immi site that:

'Certified copies' are copies authorised, or stamped as being true copies of originals, by a person or agency recognised by the law of the country in which you currently reside. All departmental offices outside Australia have the facility to certify or witness documents if necessary; this service may attract a charge.

There is a list of people who can ceritify documents in Australia here:

Statutory declaration information sheet

Basically, the qualified person looks at the original and the copies of it and puts an official stamp on the copies to say they are real copies of the original. In Australia it's much easier to find these people, and they witness and sign the documents for free. Go down to your local pharmacy and see if there is someone there, since pharmacists can be Justices of the Peace.

If you are not is Australia, the situation is more complicated. Of course most Aust. embassies can certify papers, but charge about $20 per page!! The other option is to find out how documents are certified in the country you are in and do it that way.
I have heard banks in some countries have the authority to witness and certify documents.

I also recommend searching for entries by elkitten in this forum, as she had the same question in regrad to her application.

Hope this helps :)
 

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What country are you in Marianne for most countrys will have a Justice department that could produce a list of people that are authorised to certify copies and that could be a lot cheaper than what an embassy/consulate may charge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
What country are you in Marianne for most countrys will have a Justice department that could produce a list of people that are authorised to certify copies and that could be a lot cheaper than what an embassy/consulate may charge.
Hello Wanderer, looking forward to be corresponding with you and everybode else.
Denmark. And everything is pretty new to us (my husband, myself and our two children).
So far our plan is to read and investigate, and then we might apply for the 175 independent in september or thereabout, once we have my husbands civilenginnering qualifications assesed by IEA. We have not send his papers yet though. Thanks for the best forum in the jungle of immigration etc.!
 

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I'm pleased you find the site helpful Marianne and that's the way we want it to be.

Yes, getting qualifications assessed is always the first step that needs to be done with most visa applications and as the Immigration site has information reasonably well laid out, so the IEA site [you may have already been there, or at back of the SOL list ].
Second link on Professionals and other Skilled Migrants - Workers - Visas & Immigration

Engineering is considered by Immigration to be a higher priority occupation and from the Visa Options [third link] on above page you can look at either the 175 or 176 visas, the eligibility sections having a self assessment points table.
The applying for this visa sections have a Checklist which is not just a good guide but often stated to be attached to an application.

The IEA assessment may take 2-3 months if not a bit more [usually a reference on such sites].
And then an immigration application for a higher priority is likely to take about six months if everything is reasonably straightforward.
Always a good idea to print yourself off a couple of copies of the Checklist so as you have a working copy that can become your own record.
 

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Hi Marianne

Basically u ask a authorising person to certify your documents with the following requirements:

1) their profession
2) the date
3) their full name printed
4) and they need to write "i certify this to be a true copy"

the main people registered to certify documents are doctors, pharmacists, teachers, post office managers etc.

hope it helps :)
 

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Dear Ms Marianne;

Hope it finds you and your family well!
Let me add here that color copy of the original document can also be provided to DIAC,as per the instructions provided to me by the CO.

@Super Moderator:please correct ,if I am wrong.

Thanks

Hassan Warraich
 

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Hi Marianne

Basically u ask a authorising person to certify your documents with the following requirements:

1) their profession
2) the date
3) their full name printed
4) and they need to write "i certify this to be a true copy"

the main people registered to certify documents are doctors, pharmacists, teachers, post office managers etc.

hope it helps :)
That may be so in Australia but most European countries have what they call notary publics or just notaries in some cases attached to regional courthouses.

The Australian government requirement for certification overseas is that copies are certified by people authorised by a countries government.
 
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