How do other people do it?

Go Back   Living and Working in Australia Forum With Immigration and Travel Information > Living in Australia > Visas and immigration

Visas and immigration The Australia Forum for visas, immigration and migration to Australia. Please use this section to discuss all your immigration and moving to Australia needs. Discuss visa types, time lines, submission dates, police checks and read our members' immigration success stories here.

How do other people do it?


Closed Thread
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 04-22-2010, 02:03 PM
Active Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 34
Please update your flag here .

How do other people do it?

Having lived in Australia for 18months now, I see that people from many walks of life and backgrounds live in Australia. I just have to wonder, as i know of quite a few people and hear others in public all the time who can't (or maybe won't) even speak english, i wonder how do they live legally in Australia when they barely speak english? I wonder to myself, what type of visa did these people apply for or are they just here ill-legally?

The whole immigration process seems so long, stressful and hard to get your head around at times but it leads me to believe that i must be missing out on some secret that lots of other people seem to know?

Is it possible to apply for permanent immigration/residency straight away without going down the line of skilled visa/employer sponsorship?


  #2 (permalink)  
Old 04-22-2010, 02:59 PM
Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 895
Users Flag! From australia

88 likes received
1 likes given
Hey there,

There are other visa categories besides skilled/ working visas, such as family (including spouse and parent visas) student and visas for asylum seekers. So, while skilled work visas and student visas require a high level of English in order to obtain, the other visa classes don't formally require a certian language ability for the visa to be granted as they are sponsored in most cases by and Australian citizen or permanent resident.

I myself am living an working in Korea and have met a lot of foreigners who have lived here for 10 years or more and can't even speak the language, let alone read or write it. There's nothing necessarily wrong with that because everyone has their reasons for being here, whether it be for work or to live with family, And we all know how hard it can be to get used to a new culture and way of life, with many expats ending up lonley and in culture shock. So, in order to combat this, they hang around people from their own country who speak their language and hence don't need to speak Korean at all.

But of course, if people choose to make a new country their home, they owe to themselves to adapt to the culture and language, which is why I'm trying to 'do as the Roman's do' while I'm here.

So, don't hate on those who don't speak English in Oz. Rather try and understand what they must be feeling in their new environment


Last edited by aussiegirl; 04-22-2010 at 03:02 PM.

  #3 (permalink)  
Old 04-22-2010, 06:25 PM
Active Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 36
Please update your flag here .

Smile

You said it so well Aussiegirl. I have been doing as the Romans (my mother being from Rome) in three continents. I've lived in the US where most immigrants didn't speak English and still got by. For example, most of the the Asian population in California owns a family restaurant (or a grocery store). They just need basic English. The Italians in Little Italy in San Francisco are the same. Same with the Iranians.

Although, I"m living in Belgium now (awaiting my Spouse Visa to be approved), I noticed that most of the immigrants here do not bother learning the two official languages of Belgium. Especially, the English and American expats who come to work in the international organisations where the main working language is English.

I myself have learned the two languages here and tried to integrate, but have found it so hard to socialise with the Belgians (since they do not like foreigners even if they DO speak their language). So to make a long story short, I'm hoping that our move down under will be better for our future and my children's future as they are 1/4 Australian anyway. I'm looking forward to adding the Ozzie culture to my other cultures.


Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 04-23-2010, 02:12 AM
Wanderer's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 7,467
Please update your flag here .

138 likes received
Quote:
Originally Posted by coyle1983 View Post
Having lived in Australia for 18months now, I see that people from many walks of life and backgrounds live in Australia. I just have to wonder, as i know of quite a few people and hear others in public all the time who can't (or maybe won't) even speak english, i wonder how do they live legally in Australia when they barely speak english? I wonder to myself, what type of visa did these people apply for or are they just here ill-legally?

The whole immigration process seems so long, stressful and hard to get your head around at times but it leads me to believe that i must be missing out on some secret that lots of other people seem to know?

Is it possible to apply for permanent immigration/residency straight away without going down the line of skilled visa/employer sponsorship?
I understand what you mean coyle but then there are quite a few different forms of immigration that have been in use over many decades and even centuries - we had the Chinese [ and others ] arriving in droves when gold was first discovered, a bit like the US too.

First with the skilled visas, you only need to have the primary applicant as having the required level of english and then their family members may have lesser levels.
I can recall even decades back that guys of second generation immigration I worked with would have normal english capacity but there could in particular be mothers at home and then even grandparents with very little english ability and hence they'll talk in their native tongue.

Likewise, for whatever reasons you do come across younger people talking in what does not seem to be english, possibly because their families are recent arrivals and perhaps a cultural aspect of communities sticking together more than assimilating.
The Aussie football game, Australian rules or AFL is one indicator of that for going back half a century and even though there had already been a couple of decades of post WW2 immigration from a lot of European countries, there were few European names on team sheets, players like Alex and Sammy Jesaulenko, Serge Silvagni being earlier ones but now they are more common place, and likewise with the Australian Cricket Side, there has been very few names other than of Anglo/Saxon heritage it would seem, but go to what we call Soccer or what is nationally known as Football and it'll be a different scene.

We also have many social clubs that immigrants form based on their heritage, sometimes with an Australian connection but often also not and that no doubt helps to keep their heritage culture and language alive and whilst many members of such clubs will also be strong members of the wider community, I can understand that they may fall back into using their own language quite often, it likely to be many generations before greater assimilation occurs and there'll be newer immigrants arriving all the time that keeps other languages in use.
I even know of people from non english speaking countries living in relative isolation from others who may have come from their own country or another speaking the same language or close to it and people not hearing their own mother tongue too often just love to fall back in to conversing in it given half the chance - it is probably much the same for people who normally speak english [ not just Australians ] when they may be overseas for extended periods and I know myself the pleasure of all of a sudden coming across an Aussie in that situation.

And then we have the family stream of immigration where it may not just be a sponsor and partner but a family already here with PR/Citizenship and they may have elderly parents, sole siblings or whomever that the immigration regulations make provision for to emigrate and I think that the families stick together attitude is more common to meditteranean and asian cultures than AngloSaxon.

And on top of that you have refugees via official channels and also those who get more media attention coming across the seas to add to many who are quite possibly here on overstaying visas.

But for sure, our two main capital cities are certainly becoming a melting pot of nationalities and many languages being spoken and that's possibly also to do with many immigrants never having lived other than in densely populated city conditions, it also not being so easy employment wise for people to take the opportunity for rural living or it being such a tree change for them it can be frightening! and I even know of many Anglo Saxons who do not move too far from their suburban backyards!

And I haven't mentioned students and backpackers, both groups having people who'll probably more readily converse in other than english if studying/travelling with people from their home countries, something like 400,000 students in Australia each year and backpackers getting close to 100,000 I suspect.

So yep, it does seem sometimes that you are somewhere else than in a country that has english as its major common language.

There was a report just the other day, that with projected population growth towards 40 Million by 2050, we'll also start to see more of a shift in increase of population to immigration than by birth rates so the mix and extent of languages could become even more pronounced.
Maybe the same thing happens in other major cities of native english speaking too, London, NY and a few other US and Canadian cities for example I'd expect you'd hear many languages spoken too.

And I know a couple of years back, one time in Christchurch NZ, I was waiting for a plane and the volume used could have made you think you were in another country, some being so loud a whistle to call time off would have been handy - especially if someone is on a mobile phone.





Last edited by Wanderer; 04-23-2010 at 07:01 AM.

Closed Thread

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Aboriginal People in Aus river Issues and current events 7 11-05-2015 08:48 AM
what do Australia people want to see donginellow Business and investment 2 09-14-2011 12:27 PM
G'day people fultygp New member introductions 5 08-25-2011 02:32 PM
For new people to the forum mike General chit-chat and news 1 10-30-2009 03:27 PM

LEGAL NOTICE
By using this Website, you agree to abide by our Terms and Conditions (the "Terms"). This notice does not replace our Terms, which you must read in full as they contain important information. You must not post any defamatory, unlawful or undesirable content, or any content copied from a third party, on the Website. You must not copy material from the Website except in accordance with the Terms. This Website gives users an opportunity to share information only and is not intended to contain any advice which you should rely upon. It does not replace the need to take professional or other advice. We have no liability to you or any other person in respect of any content on this Website.


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:24 PM.




Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
AustraliaForum.com