statutory declaration

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statutory declaration


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Old 11-24-2010, 01:57 PM
gmo gmo is offline
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statutory declaration

Hi guys,

Quick question when getting statutory declarations for my partners defacto visa application. If the person writing the declaration is a accountant, physiotherapist, lawyer etc, do they still need to get the declaration witnessed. Also where in london will I be able to get a copy of their passport certified? Thanks for your help


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Old 11-25-2010, 03:55 AM
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As far as I know, it would not matter whether a judge or the queen was making a statutory declaration, they still need to be witnessed by an appropriate authority to do so.
The people authorised do vary from country to country and all the Australian regulations say is that documents/copies being certified need to be certified by the people authorised for the country in which it is being done, that being a matter for that country and not Australian authorities.





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Old 11-25-2010, 08:06 PM
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Hi gmo,

Australian High Commission (London) website lists the people they accept: dima_cert - Australian High Commission

yep, it is a small list... I don't know where the list is drawn from and it possibly is just dreamt up by the Aussies. at least, according to the solicitor I am using, there is no single list of authorised people under UK law.

regardless, if the authorities publish a list of who they'll accept I think we are well advised to use it!


Last edited by iain; 11-25-2010 at 08:08 PM.

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Old 11-26-2010, 12:03 AM
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I have seen references in the past iain to the UK having a much shorter list than Australia where for instance you can usually visit a bank manager, a postmaster, the local cop shop etc. amongst a whole heap of other people.
I think the Oz HC has published what they have as a service because they get asked over there so often regardless of whether or not the local information is squirrelled away somewhere in Whitehall or the Tower.
Just out of interest, thought I'd do a quick look and very surprised to see such a reference as on Who can certify my documents?
You would think a banking organisation over there would know what they are talking about.
And then if you want to reach into the stratosphere you can get a Hague reference:
Hague Convention Abolishing the Requirement of Legalisation for Foreign Public Documents - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia and not sure how far advanced that is but it could sure make things interesting in Immigration documentation.
That convention makes reference to the FCO which I imagine is still the squirrel to be looked up.
Be interesting to know thoughts of the UK solicitor'and more so to find out whether it is the co-operative bank or the AHC that is doing the dreaming!





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Old 11-26-2010, 12:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wanderer View Post
I have seen references in the past iain to the UK having a much shorter list than Australia where for instance you can usually visit a bank manager, a postmaster, the local cop shop etc. amongst a whole heap of other people.
I think the Oz HC has published what they have as a service because they get asked over there so often regardless of whether or not the local information is squirrelled away somewhere in Whitehall or the Tower.
Just out of interest, thought I'd do a quick look and very surprised to see such a reference as on Who can certify my documents?
You would think a banking organisation over there would know what they are talking about.
And then if you want to reach into the stratosphere you can get a Hague reference:
Hague Convention Abolishing the Requirement of Legalisation for Foreign Public Documents - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia and not sure how far advanced that is but it could sure make things interesting in Immigration documentation.
That convention makes reference to the FCO which I imagine is still the squirrel to be looked up.
Be interesting to know thoughts of the UK solicitor'and more so to find out whether it is the co-operative bank or the AHC that is doing the dreaming!
Interesting links!

I have only had to certify a document once before in my life, which was for a pre-employment check here in the UK. I took it to a branch of the bank I use, the person on duty at the enquiry desk signed it off. That was that.

My UK solicitor friend - I think solicitor is a UK-specific term, it's just kind of a junior lawyer - he says it's simply up to the person requiring the witnessing what they will accept. So, the co-operative bank are happy with their definition (probably set by its regulators), they think it would stand up in court, so that's what they use. Other places will define it differently.

I don't know if that's true and it sounds like a recipe for pointless arguments in court...

Still it looks from your Hague Convention link like there must be SOME official list of professions, if only for international law matters. So maybe that's what the AHC are using.

The table from the AHC seems to be a translation from Australian professions to UK & Ireland ones. So that's another theory - they looked for an official legal list, didn't find one, so they used the Australian list and translated it. But then threw away half of the results. :-(

Just guesses, I have absolutely no idea :-)


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