Offshore Partner Visa 309/100 Waiting Room - Page 89

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Offshore Partner Visa 309/100 Waiting Room - Page 89


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  #881 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2017, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by al_ghazal View Post
Not to derail the conversation but I don't see what is so much better about Australia than any other country. Actually I could reel off a fair few disadvantages.

Sure it's a privilege to live in any developed country and yet the process here is just so much more expensive/difficult than other comparable nations. So saying it's a privilege is really no excuse at all, the process is just too expensive and inefficient. Certain segments of the community will say it's a privilege but that's only because they're trying to push their own agenda, it's nothing to do with the actual opportunities available here.
The answer to that is, why move here then?

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  #882 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2017, 10:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by al_ghazal View Post
Not to derail the conversation but I don't see what is so much better about Australia than any other country. Actually I could reel off a fair few disadvantages.

Sure it's a privilege to live in any developed country and yet the process here is just so much more expensive/difficult than other comparable nations. So saying it's a privilege is really no excuse at all, the process is just too expensive and inefficient. Certain segments of the community will say it's a privilege but that's only because they're trying to push their own agenda, it's nothing to do with the actual opportunities available here.
It is a privilege to live in ANY country in the world not just Australia.

For people that are not born Australian citizens they are more than welcome to go back to their home country. Those that are born Australian citizens either need to suck it up or find another country to call home.

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  #883 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2017, 10:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Mish View Post
It is a privilege to live in ANY country in the world not just Australia.

For people that are not born Australian citizens they are more than welcome to go back to their home country. Those that are born Australian citizens either need to suck it up or find another country to call home.
Exactly. The way I see it - I have a right to reside in the UK, it is a privalige for me to be allowed to live in Australia.

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  #884 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2017, 12:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Mania View Post
The answer to that is, why move here then?
I would say the most common answer is because of the pull of love and family - for the Australian half of the couple it's elderly parents, wanting to see one's nieces and nephews grow up, wanting to have family support when one brings children into the world (a new mother usually wants her own mother to be nearby). For the foreign half of the couple, it's the love of their partner and enabling them to be near their family.

There's many a loving partner who doesn't necessarily want to move to Australia but does so in order for their spouse/partner to be near their family. And vice versa; in all relationships spanning two or more countries someone has to give up their homeland in order for the relationship to continue. It's not a question of Australia being any better than another country, it's a question of where one's family happens to live.

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Last edited by Arianwen; 02-17-2017 at 12:34 PM.

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  #885 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2017, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Arianwen View Post
I would say the most common answer is because of the pull of love and family - for the Australian half of the couple it's elderly parents, wanting to see one's nieces and nephews grow up, wanting to have family support when one brings children into the world (a new mother usually wants her own mother to be nearby). For the foreign half of the couple, it's the love of their partner and enabling them to be near their family.

There's many a loving partner who doesn't necessarily want to move to Australia but does so in order for their spouse/partner to be near their family. And vice versa; in all relationships spanning two or more countries someone has to give up their homeland in order for the relationship to continue. It's not a question of Australia being any better than another country, it's a question of where one's family happens to live.
Uh hu, tourist visa, student visa, skilled migration visa, business visa, working holiday visa to name but a few visas that aren't related to family movements. Of the partners how many of those partnerships started whilst in Australia on a visa I'm willing to bet more then 50% of them.

Just for reference approximately 70% of migration visas are skilled, not family stream.


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  #886 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2017, 06:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Mish View Post
It is a privilege to live in ANY country in the world not just Australia.

For people that are not born Australian citizens they are more than welcome to go back to their home country. Those that are born Australian citizens either need to suck it up or find another country to call home.
I am not sure the point I made was clear, I said it was a privilege to live in Australia as with any developed nation. I'm not sure I'd agree that it's a privilege to live in any country. Some countries ban rights for certain segments of the population without consideration of how long they have lived there or their contribution to the community, that's hardly a privilege.

Irrespective of that what I was trying to make clear was the immigration process is expensive and inefficient when compared to other 'comparable' nations and further more, language like 'privilege' in the immigration context - particularly when used by our leaders - is a dangerous path to travel. Next you'll see it paired with national security and all of a sudden entire countries are banned from entry. We should all feel nervous about that.


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  #887 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2017, 06:59 PM
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yeah got my partner subclass 100 grant after 14 months period.had phone interview for 15 minutes and i won.

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  #888 (permalink)  
Old 02-17-2017, 08:26 PM
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Originally Posted by al_ghazal View Post
I am not sure the point I made was clear, I said it was a privilege to live in Australia as with any developed nation. I'm not sure I'd agree that it's a privilege to live in any country. Some countries ban rights for certain segments of the population without consideration of how long they have lived there or their contribution to the community, that's hardly a privilege.

Irrespective of that what I was trying to make clear was the immigration process is expensive and inefficient when compared to other 'comparable' nations and further more, language like 'privilege' in the immigration context - particularly when used by our leaders - is a dangerous path to travel. Next you'll see it paired with national security and all of a sudden entire countries are banned from entry. We should all feel nervous about that.
But it is a privilege to live in any country regardless of if it is considered a good country or not. We have to ask to live in that country it is not automatically given to us.

You can't always compare money in regards to visas for example both the American and UK visas the sponsor needs to earn a specific amoint to be able to sponsor where we don't meaning that people on Centrelink can sponsor otherwise they would not be able to live with their partner.

The American K1 visa (fiance) comes with no work rights and they need to marry within 90 days. The UK fiance visa I have a feeling has no work rights either. The UK has an English test requirement and they actually think it is too easy so they will now make it harder. The UK the applicant has to people money to access the public health system.

Those are just a few examples. Yes ours cost more but for our visa we get things the others don't and we allow everyone to be able to apply for a visa. I have seen people in both the USA and UK struggle to get their partner to join them because they don't earn enough money. Some even need to work 2 jobs just for their spouse to join them. I just can't imagine having to work a full job and a part time job just to get a spouse here.


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  #889 (permalink)  
Old 02-18-2017, 01:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Mania View Post
Uh hu, tourist visa, student visa, skilled migration visa, business visa, working holiday visa to name but a few visas that aren't related to family movements. Of the partners how many of those partnerships started whilst in Australia on a visa I'm willing to bet more then 50% of them.

Just for reference approximately 70% of migration visas are skilled, not family stream.
We are talking in the context of a thread about partner visas. The expense and inefficiency that was mentioned by another forum member was no doubt meant in relation to partner visas. Skilled, student and working holiday visa don't cost $7k and take a year plus to be processed, so I don't see that they're entirely relevant to the topic discussed.

I don't know what proportion of partner visa applicants began their relationship in Australia and nor do you; most of the ones I know of personally started overseas but of course that may not be representative of the whole. In any case all partner applicants, regardless of whether they first came to Australia for other reasons, are obliged to go through the lengthy, costly partner visa process because of their commitment to their partner, not because they think Australia would be a nice place to live - at least, that's how it should be and if it's not, it's fraud. It's too late at that point to 'choose' another equally good country with a fairer system.

Sure, we all have to accept there is no automatic right of entry or residence for our partners but it doesn't mean we can't raise criticism about how the process is handled in our country. Among the various advantages and disadvantages of living in Australia, one of the positives - as in other western democracies - is the right to criticise the workings of our government and its departments.

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  #890 (permalink)  
Old 02-18-2017, 05:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Arianwen View Post
We are talking in the context of a thread about partner visas. The expense and inefficiency that was mentioned by another forum member was no doubt meant in relation to partner visas. Skilled, student and working holiday visa don't cost $7k and take a year plus to be processed, so I don't see that they're entirely relevant to the topic discussed.

I don't know what proportion of partner visa applicants began their relationship in Australia and nor do you; most of the ones I know of personally started overseas but of course that may not be representative of the whole. In any case all partner applicants, regardless of whether they first came to Australia for other reasons, are obliged to go through the lengthy, costly partner visa process because of their commitment to their partner, not because they think Australia would be a nice place to live - at least, that's how it should be and if it's not, it's fraud. It's too late at that point to 'choose' another equally good country with a fairer system.

Sure, we all have to accept there is no automatic right of entry or residence for our partners but it doesn't mean we can't raise criticism about how the process is handled in our country. Among the various advantages and disadvantages of living in Australia, one of the positives - as in other western democracies - is the right to criticise the workings of our government and its departments.
The thread title is irrelevant as the conversation is off topic, the discussion is in relation to entry to all entry to Australia not just 309/100.

RE proportion of relationships to start in Aus - re read my comment I never claimed to, I took an educated guess considering the higher portion of Australians in Australia it stands to reason more relationships with Australians would form whilst in Australia.

"The expense and inefficiency that was mentioned by another forum member was no doubt meant in relation to partner visas. " - cool story, scroll up further to where i made the comment about it being a privalidge and the whole discussion that stemmed from it, it was in relation to all Australian entry and migration.

Commitment to partner and nice place to live can mutually co exist so fraud is subjective. I'm committed to my partner, I, as does she, find Australia nicer then the UK - hence us applying for an Australian visa, despite being able to easily meet the cheaper U.K. requirements - please advise the fraud we have committed so that I can be reasonably punished.

Your final statement derails your argument. If you agree people don't have an automatic right to entry then how can entry not be a privalidge....

By all means criticise the government, I don't disagree that the Australian immigration process can be a pain in the ass. However if the Australian people saw the time and expense of processing of visas as a major concern then there would be a heavy focus on the current political campeigns on how to shortern that process and make it cheaper. Unfortunately a large portion of the voting population either don't care or would prefer stricter controls.

You're not obliged to go through the partner process. If you can offer Australia skilled work then you can apply for a skilled visa. The high cost of entry, that kind of coexists with the fact you instantly get Medicare. The long waiting times? You can thank all of the false applicants.


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